The Caravaggio: Reflections on Political Change and the Clinton Administration

Front Cover
Westview Press, 1983 - Art - 404 pages
3 Reviews
Caravaggio is the most arresting European painter of the years around 1600. Although he died in 1610, in his thirty-ninth year, he is often considered the most important Italian painter of the entire seventeenth century. He is also notorious as a painter-assassin: he killed a man in 1606, and a similar crime was rumored in his youth. Caravaggio's painting speak to us more personally and more poignantly than any others of the time. We meet him over the gulf of centuries, not as a commanding and admirable historical figure like Annibale Carracci, but as an artist who somehow cut through the artistic conventions of his time right down to the universal blood and bone of life.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Caravaggio

User Review  - linhtalinhtinh - Goodreads

While his paintings are generally not of my taste, I could not deny the fact that they evoke overwhelming feelings. There is this strange attractiveness, both beautiful and scary at the same time ... Read full review

Review: Caravaggio

User Review  - Hillary - Goodreads

great prose... some outdated information, though Read full review

Contents

V
15
VI
50
VII
89
VIII
91
IX
118
X
138
XI
149
XII
164
XV
235
XVI
236
XVII
256
XVIII
268
XIX
334
XX
343
XXI
388
XXII
394

XIII
207
XIV
209
XXIII
395
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 74 - When he was at the table with them, he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them. Then their eyes were opened, and they recognized him; and he vanished from their sight. They said to each other, "Were not our hearts burning within us while he was talking to us on the road, while he was opening the scriptures to us?
Page 74 - Some of those who were with us went to the tomb, and found it just as the women had said; but him they did not see.
Page 67 - Fear'd her stern frown, and she was queen o' the woods. What -was that snaky-headed Gorgon shield, That wise Minerva wore, unconquer'd virgin, Wherewith she freez'd her foes to congeal'd stone, But rigid looks of chaste austerity...
Page 124 - As I made my journey and drew near to Damascus, about noon a great light from heaven suddenly shone about me. And I fell to the ground and heard a voice saying to me, 'Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?
Page 99 - It is not the healthy that need a doctor, but the sick. Go and learn what that text means, "I require mercy, not sacrifice." I did not come to invite virtuous people, but sinners.
Page 99 - But if it is by the finger of God that I drive out the devils, then be sure the kingdom of God has already come upon you.
Page 74 - Stay with us, for evening approaches, and the day is almost over.' So he went in to stay with them. And when he had sat down with them at table, he took bread and said the blessing; he broke the bread, and offered it to them. Then their eyes were opened, and they recognized him; but he vanished from their sight.
Page 72 - That same day two of them were on their way to a village called Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem, talking together about all that had happened.
Page 72 - a prophet powerful in speech and action before God and the whole people; how our chief priests and rulers handed him over to be sentenced to death, and crucified him. But we had been hoping that he was the man to liberate Israel.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information