The Religion of Senators in the Roman Empire: Power and the Beyond

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 22, 2010 - History - 267 pages
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This book examines the connection between political and religious power in the pagan Roman Empire through a study of senatorial religion. Presenting a new collection of historical, epigraphic, prosopographic and material evidence, it argues that as Augustus turned to religion to legitimize his powers, senators in turn also came to negotiate their own power, as well as that of the emperor, partly in religious terms. In Rome, the body of the senate and priesthoods helped to maintain the religious power of the senate; across the Empire senators defined their magisterial powers by following the model of emperors and by relying on the piety of sacrifice and benefactions. The ongoing participation and innovations of senators confirm the deep ability of imperial religion to engage the normative, symbolic and imaginative aspects of religious life among senators.
  

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Contents

PART I
17
The new senate of the empire and religion
24
Religious groups among senators
56
The dynamics of senatorial religion in Rome and Italy
93
the provinces
122
151
131
Towards a theology of Roman religion
153
Innovations and aspirations
186
Two saecular games
209
Appendices
215
Bibliography
226
Index borninurn
253
General index
260
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Zsuzsanna Várhelyi is Assistant Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Boston. She has contributed many articles on Roman history to many volumes and journals, and co-edited, with J.-J. Aubert, A Tall Order: Writing the Social History of the Ancient World. Essays in Honor of William V. Harris (2005).

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