Gandhi's Truth: On the Origins of Militant Nonviolence

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W. W. Norton & Company, Apr 17, 1993 - Biography & Autobiography - 474 pages
7 Reviews

In this study of Mahatma Gandhi, psychoanalyst Erik H. Erikson explores how Gandhi succeeded in mobilizing the Indian people both spiritually and politically as he became the revolutionary innovator of militant non-violence and India became the motherland of large-scale civil disobedience.

  

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Review: Gandhi's Truth: On the Origins of Militant Nonviolence

User Review  - Bryce Maxwell - Goodreads

Great book overall. Erikson wasn't as good a writer as Freud or Jung, but you can tell how much work he put into the book. He offers an extremely clear, elaborate portrait leading up to "the event ... Read full review

Review: Gandhi's Truth: On the Origins of Militant Nonviolence

User Review  - Rick - Goodreads

Erikson'e excellent analysis of how Gandhi understood his role in engineering India's release from colonial control is worth a read. It's also a discussion of how groups of people form national ... Read full review

Contents

Preface and Acknowledgments
9
First Encounters
19
A Seminar in Ahmedabad
33
The Elusive Event
45
THE INQUIRY
55
The Counterplayer
68
HI Four Old Indians
81
THE PAST
97
A Personal Word
229
Prophet in His Own Country
255
Companions and Counterplayers
296
The Event Retold
322
Aftermath
364
Homo Religiosus
395
The Instrument
410
MARCH TO THE SEA
443

Childhood and Youth
103
From Vow to Vocation
141
HI Householder in South Africa
176

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About the author (1993)

A winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, Erik H. Erikson was renowned worldwide as teacher, clinician, and theorist in the field of psychoanalysis and human development.

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