Frankenstein

Front Cover
Plain Label Books, Jan 1, 2010 - Fiction - 112 pages
1500 Reviews
In Mary Shelley's classic tale of horror, Victor Frankenstein creates life—and a monster beyond his control. In trying to bring human life into being, Frankenstein lets loose a monster that will stop at nothing to destroy all that Frankenstein holds dear. Follow the powerful story of love, friendship, and fiends in the Calico Illustrated Classics adaptation of Shelley's Frankenstein. Calico Chapter Books is an imprint of Magic Wagon, a division of ABDO Group. Grades 3-8.
  

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5 stars
407
4 stars
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3 stars
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2 stars
174
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55

Amazing writing for such a young person. - Goodreads
Shelley's turgid and overwrought prose is a slog. - Goodreads
I loved this book, the poetry, imagery, the story. - Goodreads
The overall plot was not very good. - Goodreads
At one level, it is a yarn: a simple horror story. - Goodreads
The story also moves at a slow pace. - Goodreads

Review: Frankenstein

User Review  - Nicholas Cheng - Goodreads

Ever since I was a child, the word Frankenstein has evoked in me a dire impression. Being dispersed amongst pop culture / horror in a wide range of media formats, and stretching iconically along all ... Read full review

Review: Frankenstein

User Review  - Dee Mason - Goodreads

Can't believe Mary Shelly was only 18. This is a book I've pretended to read for years I have now read it, it was ok but I think it was a little disappointing and I can't putt finger on why, although ... Read full review

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Page 81 - I considered the being whom I had cast among mankind and endowed with the will and power to effect purposes of horror, such as the deed which he had now done, nearly in the light of my own vampire, my own spirit let loose from the grave and forced to destroy all that was dear to me.
Page 44 - Such were the professor's words - rather let me say such the words of the fate - enounced to destroy me. As he went on I felt as if my soul were grappling with a palpable enemy; one by one the various keys were touched which formed the mechanism of my being; chord after chord was sounded, and soon my mind was filled with one...
Page 184 - What then I was. The sounding cataract Haunted me like a passion : the tall rock, The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, Their colours and their forms, were then to me An appetite; a feeling and a love, That had no need of a remoter charm, By thought supplied, nor any interest Unborrowed from the eye.
Page 55 - It was on a dreary night of November that I beheld the accomplishment of my toils. With an anxiety that almost amounted to agony, I collected the instruments of life around me, that I might infuse a spark of being into the lifeless thing that lay at my feet.
Page 56 - I beheld the wretch - the miserable monster whom I had created. He held up the curtain of the bed; and his eyes, if eyes they may be called, were fixed on me. His jaws opened, and he muttered some inarticulate sounds, while a grin wrinkled his cheeks.
Page 108 - We rest — a dream has power to poison sleep ; We rise — one wandering thought pollutes the day; We feel, conceive or reason, laugh or weep ; Embrace fond woe, or cast our cares away...
Page 111 - But I will not be tempted to set myself in opposition to thee. I am thy creature, and I will be even mild and docile to my natural lord and king, if thou wilt also perform thy part the which thou owest me. Oh, Frankenstein, be not equitable to every other, and trample upon me alone, to whom thy justice, and even thy clemency and affection, is most due. Remember, that I am thy creature; I ought to be thy Adam; but I am rather the fallen angel, whom thou drivest from joy for no misdeed.
Page 267 - But now that virtue has become to me a shadow and that happiness and affection are turned into bitter and loathing despair, in what should I seek for sympathy? I am content to suffer alone while my sufferings shall endure: when I die, I am well satisfied that abhorrence and opprobrium should load my memory.
Page 58 - Like one, that on a lonesome road Doth walk in fear and dread, And having once turned round walks on, And turns no more his head ; Because he knows, a frightful fiend Doth close behind him tread.
Page 167 - Awake, fairest, thy lover is near— he who would give his life but to obtain one look of affection from thine eyes: my beloved, awake! "The sleeper stirred; a thrill of terror ran through me. Should she indeed awake, and see me, and curse me, and denounce the murderer? Thus would she assuredly act, if her darkened eyes opened, and she beheld me. The thought was...

About the author (2010)

Dotti Enderle is the author of the childrens mystery series, Fortune Tellers Club, and the educational series, Storytime Discoveries. She began her publishing career in 1995, writing for popular childrens magazines. Her work has been included in Babybug, Ladybug, Childrens Playmate, Nature Friend, Turtle and many more.
As a professional storyteller, Dotti has entertained at numerous schools, libraries, museums and festivals since 1993. She takes pride in her vast collection of original stories and folktales, and specializes in participation stories, allowing the audience to join in the fun.
Dotti is a member of The Society of Childrens Book Writers & Illustrator and the Texas Reading Association.
A native Texan, Dotti lived throughout Texas as a small child, but Houston has been her home since the age of eight. She lives with her husband, two teenage daughters, and a lazy cat named Oliver.

Mary Shelley was born Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin on August 30, 1797 in London, the daughter of William Godwin--a radical philosopher and novelist, and Mary Wollstonecraft--a renowned feminist and the author of Vindication of the Rights of Woman. She eloped to France with Shelley in 1814, although they were not married until 1816, after the suicide of his first wife. She began work on Frankenstein in 1816 in Switzerland, while they were staying with Lord Byron, and it was published in 1818 to immediate acclaim. She died in London in 1851.

Eric Scott Fisher is a freelance illustrator living in Morris, Illinois with his wife Sarah and daughter Molly. He devotes his time to illustrating books and magazines for children and young readers.

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