Coriolanus (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Sep 1, 1999 - Drama - 192 pages
7 Reviews
“O mother, mother! What have you done?”
Coriolanus


Eminent Shakespearean scholars Jonathan Bate and Eric Rasmussen provide a fresh new edition of this gripping political and personal tragedy—along with more than a hundred pages of exclusive features, including
 
• an original Introduction to Coriolanus
• incisive scene-by-scene synopsis and analysis with vital facts about the work
• commentary on past and current productions based on interviews with leading directors, actors, and designers
• photographs of key RSC productions
• an overview of Shakespeare’s theatrical career and chronology of his plays
 
Ideal for students, theater professionals, and general readers, these modern and accessible editions from the Royal Shakespeare Company set a new standard in Shakespearean literature for the twenty-first century.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AliceAnna - LibraryThing

I couldn't have followed this story if my life depended on it. Something about a talented warrior who has mama manipulating him on one side and his cohorts betraying him on the other. Who knows? Who cares? Definitely the weakest of all the Bard's works I've read thus far. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nycke137 - LibraryThing

I listened to this book on audio in preparation to see the performance. I wanted to familiarize myself with it since I didn't get into Shakespeare much in high school or after. If I had known that his plays were also gruesome and bloody, I would have been enjoying Shakespeare a long time ago. Read full review

Contents

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE OF STRATFORDUPONAVON GENTLEMAN
Books About Shakespeares Theater
Books About Shakespeares Life
Books About the Shakespeare Texts
I1Enter a company of mutinous Citizens with staves clubs and other weapons
I2Enter Tullus Aufidius with Senators of Corioles
I3Enter Volumnia and Virgilia mother and wife to Martius They set them down on two low stools and sew
I4Enter Martius Titus Lartius with a Trumpeter Drum and Colors with Captains and Soldiers as before the city Corioles To them a Messenger
III1Cornets Enter Coriolanus Menenius all the Gentry Cominius Titus Lartius and other Senators
III2Enter Coriolanus with Nobles
III3Enter Sicinius and Brutus
IV1Enter Coriolanus Volumnia Virgilia Menenius Cominius with the young Nobility of Rome
IV2Enter the two Tribunes Sicinius and Brutus with the Aedile
IV3Enter a Roman and a Volsce
IV4Enter Coriolanus in mean apparel disguised and muffled
IV5Music plays Enter a Servingman

I5Enter certain Romans with spoils
I6Enter Cominius as it were in retire with Soldiers
I7Titus Lartius having set a guard upon Corioles going with Drum and Trumpet toward Cominius and Caius Martius enters with a Lieutenant other S...
I8Alarum as in battle Enter Martius and Aufidius at several doors
I9Alarum A retreat is sounded Flourish Enter at one door Cominius with the Romans at another door Martius with his arm in a scarf
I10A flourish Cornets Enter Tullus Aufidius bloody with two or three Soldiers
II1Enter Menenius with the two Tribunes of the People Sicinius and Brutus
II2Enter two Officers to lay cushions as it were in the Capitol
II3Enter seven or eight Citizens
IV6Enter the two Tribunes Sicinius and Brutus
IV7Enter Aufidius with his Lieutenant
V1Enter Menenius Cominius Sicinius Brutus the two Tribunes with others
V2Enter Menenius to the Watch on guard
V3Enter Coriolanus and Aufidius with others
V4Enter Menenius and Sicinius
V5Enter two Senators with Ladies Volumnia Virgilia Valeria passing over the stage with other Lords
V6Enter Tullus Aufidius with Attendants
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About the author (1999)

William Shakespeare was born in Stratford-upon-Avon, England, in 1564. He is widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language. We're pretty sure he would think this version of his play is awesome.

Stephen Orgel is the J. E. Reynolds Professor in Humanities at Stanford University. His books include "The Authentic Shakespeare," "Impersonations: The Performance of Gender in Shakespeare's England," and "The Illusion of Power," In addition to his Shakespeare editions, he has edited works of Ben Jonson, Marlowe, and Milton.
A. R. Braunmuller is professor of English and comparative literature at UCLA, where he teaches courses on English and European drama from 1500 to the present. He has written critical volumes on George Peele and George Chapman and has edited "King John" and "Macbeth,

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