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Books Books 1 - 4 of 4 on I [John Farrago] was a man of about fifty-three years of age, of good natural sense,....  
" I [John Farrago] was a man of about fifty-three years of age, of good natural sense, and considerable reading; but in some things whimsical, owing perhaps to his greater knowledge of books than of the world... "
Modern Chivalry: Or The Adventures of Captain Farrago and Teague O'Regan - Page 19
by Hugh Henry Brackenridge - 1846
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The Republic Reborn: War and the Making of Liberal America, 1790-1820

Steven Watts - History - 1989 - 406 pages
...his community. He was possessed of "good natural sense, and considerable reading; but in some things whimsical, owing perhaps to his greater knowledge of books than of the world." According to the author, the ideas of the old republican gentleman "were drawn chiefly from what may...
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Early American Writing

Giles B. Gunn - Fiction - 1994 - 629 pages
...about fifty-three years of age, of good natural sense, and considerable reading; but in some things whimsical, owing perhaps to his greater knowledge...degree, also, to his having never married, being what they call an old bachelor, a characteristic of which is, usually, singularity and whim. He had the...
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Modern Chivalry: Containing the Adventures of Captain John Farrago and ...

Hugh Henry Brackenridge - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 335 pages
...of books than of the world; but, in some degree, also, to his having never married, being what they call an old bachelor, a characteristic of which is,...professions, he had lived the greater part of his life on a small farm, which he cultivated with servants or hired hands, as he could conveniently supply...
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Quixotic Fictions of the USA 1792-1815

Sarah F. Wood - History - 2005 - 314 pages
...about fifty-three years of age, of good natural sense, and considerable reading; but in some things whimsical, owing perhaps to his greater knowledge of books than of the world' (MC, 6). Time and again, the narrator contrasts Farrago's alienation from the westerners he meets with...
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