Mind Race: A Firsthand Account of One Teenager's Experience with Bipolar Disorder

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Oxford University Press, Aug 15, 2006 - Family & Relationships - 174 pages
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The life of a person with bipolar disorder can be tumultuous. Imagine living in a world divided into many parts: one is fast-paced, frantic, energetic--you are at the top of your game and feeling invincible; another is so bleak and dark that even the simple task of going to the store requires Herculean effort. Now imagine a third: going about your daily routing when another manifestation, the mixed state, combines these symptoms simultaneously. This is just a glimpse into the world of a person with bipolar disorderMany people diagnosed with this disorder are adolescents: young people who often feel isolated, unsure of who to talk to, or where to turn for help or answers. Having been diagnosed with the disorder at age fifteen, Patrick Jamieson knows firsthand the highs and lows and bring his experiences to bear in Mind Race: A Firsthand Account of One Teenager's Experience with Bipolar Disorder, the first in the Annenberg Mental Health Initiative series written specifically for teenagers and young adults. Mind Race is a first-person account, aimed at teens who have recently been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, informative in a compassionate, good-humored, yet authoritative manner. Jamieson discusses his own challenges and triumphs, and offers advice on dealing with developing symptoms such as how to recognize the beginning of a mood shift. In accessible language, he presents the latest in scientific research on the disorder, treatment options, and how to cope with side effects of different medications. He includes a detailed F.A.Q. that answers the questions a newly diagnosed adolescent is likely to have, and also offers suggestions on how to communicate with friends and family about the bipolar experience.With Mind Race, Jamieson offers hope to teens and young adults living with bipolar disorder, helping them to navigate and overcome their challenges so they can lead a full and rewarding life.
  

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Review: Mind Race: A Firsthand Account of One Teenager's Experience with Bipolar Disorder

User Review  - Karen Mayes - Goodreads

Hm. I have a better understanding of adolescent depression... I understand that everyone experiences depression differently. So it's unfair for any of us to compare that person's depression with other person's depression. Brains are tricky, that's all I can say. Read full review

Contents

There and Back A Bipolar Trip
1
Bipolar High School
3
A LiteraryMinded Delusion
8
A Quick Reflection
9
How It All Began
11
Austin Texas
12
Philadelphia Pennsylvania
17
Bipolar 101
22
How to Handle Suicidal Thoughts
69
Hospitalization
70
The Psychiatric Ward
71
The Patient Is a Risk
80
Sailing the Bureaucracy of Boredom
85
Is Getting Weirder Normal?
87
Stigma
90
The Illness Is Not Our Identity
94

The Catcher in the Ryes Holden Caulfield and Manic Depression
30
What Do Doctors Know About Bipolar Disorder and How Do They Know It?
33
The Different Types of Bipolar Disorder
35
The Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder
37
A CloseUp of the Difficulties
44
What Causes Bipolar Disorder?
46
Can Other Conditions Occur with Bipolar Disorder?
49
The Dangers of Doing Nothing
51
The Bottom Line
52
Getting Help
53
Medication
54
Psychotherapy
61
Other Therapies
66
The SelfFulfilling Prophecy and Misconceptions About Violence
101
Stigma Revisited
103
One in Two Million
105
Three Distinguished People Who Have Bipolar Disorder
106
My Life Today
108
Dont Give Up
109
Some Frequently Asked Questions for the Recently Diagnosed
111
Glossary
147
Resources
153
Books
155
Bibliography
157
Index
165
Copyright

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About the author (2006)


Patrick Jamieson, Ph.D., is Associate Director of the Adolescent Risk Communication Institute of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania. He is the series editor of the 12-book Annenberg Mental Health Initiative (AMHI) trade series of books for parents and teens. Moira Rynn, M.D., is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Medical Director of the Mood and Anxiety Disorder Program and of the Child and Adolescent Research Service (CAReS) at the University of Pennsylvania.

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