The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln

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W.W. Norton & Co., Oct 1, 2008 - Biography & Autobiography - 496 pages
21 Reviews
Acclaimed as the definitive study of the period by one of the greatest American historians, The Rise of American Democracy traces a historical arc from the earliest days of the republic to the opening shots of the Civil War. Ferocious clashes among the Founders over the role of ordinary citizens in a government of "we, the people" were eventually resolved in the triumph of Andrew Jackson. Thereafter, Sean Wilentz shows, a fateful division arose between two starkly opposed democracies—a division contained until the election of Abraham Lincoln sparked its bloody resolution. Winner of the Bancroft Award, shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize, finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, a New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2005 and best book of New York magazine and The Economist.

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Review: The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln

User Review  - James Violand - Goodreads

A brilliant work showing how enfranchisement evolved away from restricted power. Read full review

Review: The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln

User Review  - Michael - Goodreads

Essential reading for anyone interested in American history and democracy. Wilentz' book is a rich, fascinating dissection of the evolution of the meaning(s) of democracy in the US from the ... Read full review

Contents

American Democracy in a Revolutionary Age
3
The Republican Interest and the SelfCreated
17
The Making of Jeffersonian Democracy
31
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Robert sean Wilentz was born in 1951 in New York City. He earned his first B.A. from Colunbia University in 1972 and his second from Oxford University in 1974 on a Kellett Fellowship. He continued his education at Yale University where he earned his M.A. degree in 1975 and his PhD. in 1980. His writings are focused on the importance of class and race in the early national period. He has also co-authored books on nineteenth-century religion and working class life. His book The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln, won the Bancroft Prize. He has also written about modern U.S. history in his book, The Age of Reagan: A History, 1974-2008. He has been the Sidney and Ruth Lapidus Professor of History at Princeton University since 1979. Robert Wilentz is also a contributing editor at The New Republic. He writes on music, the arts, history and politics. He received a Grammy nomination and a 2005 ASCAP Deems Taylor Award for musical commentary on the musician Bob Dylan.