A History of Swan's Island, Maine (Google eBook)

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Hancock County Pub.Company, 1898 - Maine imprints - 244 pages
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Page 20 - Together with all and singular, the appurtenances thereunto belonging, or in any wise appertaining ; to have and to hold the above described goods and chattels, unto the said party of the second part, his heirs and assigns, forever.
Page 184 - FISH-DAY. 373 line is felt eagerly for a bite, but not the faintest nibble is perceptible. The mackerel, which but a moment ago were fairly rushing on board, have in that moment disappeared so completely that not a sign of one is left. The vessel next under our lee holds them a little longer than we, but they finally also disappear from her side. And so on all around us And now we have time to look about us to compare notes on each other's successes to straighten our back bones, nearly broken...
Page 46 - One of the Mohawk leaders looked up and answered promptly : ' Oh, never mind, squire. Just come out here, if you please, and we'll settle the bill in two minutes.
Page 46 - Well, boys, you've had a fine night for your Indian caper. But, mind, you've got to pay the fiddler yet." "O, never mind", replied one of the leaders, " never mind, squire ! Just come out here, if you please, and we'll settle the bill in two minutes.
Page 104 - BUT now they that are younger than I have me in derision, whose fathers I would have disdained to have set with the dogs of my flock.
Page 183 - Shorten up," says the skipper, and we shorten in our lines to about eight feet from the rail to the hooks, when we can jerk them in just as fast as we can move our hands and arms. " Keep your lines clear," is now the word, as the doomed fish flip faster and faster into the barrels standing to receive them. Here is one greedy fellow already casting furtive glances behind him, and calculating in his mind how many fish he will have to lose in the operation of getting his second strike-barrel. Now you...
Page 182 - There, by Jove ! the captain hauls back there, I told you so ! skipper's got him no aha, captain, you haul back too savagely !" With the first movement of the captain's arm, indicating the presence of fish, everybody rushes madly to the rail. Jigs are heard on all sides plashing into the water, and eager hands and arms are stretched at their full length over the side, feeling anxiously for a nibble. " Sh hish there's something just passed my fly I felt him," says an old man...
Page 183 - And now the rain increases. We hear jibs rattling down ; and glancing up hastily, I am surprised to find our vessel surrounded on all sides by the fleet, which has already become aware that we have got fish alongside. Meantime the wind rises, and the sea struggles against the rain, which is endeavoring with its steady patter to subdue the turmoil of old Ocean. 'We are already on our third barrel each, and still the fish come in as fast as ever, and the business (sport it has ceased to be some...
Page 117 - April 30, 1811, and they were the parents of ten children, five sons and five daughters, and of these children, my father was the third.
Page 182 - ... up which I manage to fall in my haste, and then spring into the hold for a strike-barrel. And now the mainsail is up, the jib down, and the captain is throwing bait. It is not yet quite light, but we hear other mainsails going up all round us. A cool drizzle makes the morning unmistakably uncomfortable, and we stand around half asleep, with our sore hands in our pockets, wishing we were at home. The skipper, however, is holding his lines over the rail with an air which clearly intimates that...

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