Thinking about Sexual Harassment: A Guide for the Perplexed

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Oxford University Press, 2001 - Philosophy - 315 pages
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This illuminating work on one of today's most provocative issues provides all the necessary information for careful, critical thinking about the concept of sexual harassment. Consisting mainly of two parts, it first traces the construction of the concept of sexual harassment from the original public uses of the term to its definitions in the law, in legal cases, and in empirical research. It then analyzes philosophical definitions of sexual harassment and a number of issues that have arisen in the law, including the reasonable woman standard and whether same-sex harassment should be considered sex discrimination. Sure to spark intense discussion, this book explains a complex notion in a lucid and engaging manner appropriate for anyone broadly curious about the notion of sexual harassment.
  

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Contents

Introduction
3
THE HISTORY OF SEXUAL HARASSMENT
23
The Conception of Sexual Harassment
25
The Legal Conception of Sexual Harassment
37
Sexual Harassment and Empirical Research
101
THEORETICAL ISSUES
139
Philosophical Conceptions of Sexual Harassment
141
Legal Issues
175
Conclusions
221
Notes
233
Bibliography
295
Index
309
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Margaret A. Crouch is at Eastern Michigan University.

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