Walks Through Islington: Comprising an Historical and Descriptive Account of that Extensive and Important District, Both in Its Ancient and Present State: Together with Some Particulars of the Most Remarkable Objects Immediately Adjacent (Google eBook)

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Sherwood, Gilbert, & Piper, 1835 - Islington (London, England) - 412 pages
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James Ballard of Herefordshire

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Page 376 - Plate sin with gold, And the strong lance of justice hurtless breaks : Arm it in rags, a pigmy's straw doth pierce it.
Page 376 - A man may see how this world goes, with no eyes. Look with thine ears: see how yon' justice rails upon yon' simple thief. Hark, in thine ear: Change places; and, handydandy, which is the justice, which is the thief?
Page 85 - Act for Building and Promoting the Building of Additional Churches in Populous Parishes?
Page 141 - Hobbs told me that the cause of his Lordship's death was trying an experiment; vi^., as he was taking the Aire in a coach with Dr. Witherborne (a Scotchman, Physitian to the King), towards Highgate, snow lay on the ground, and it came into my Lord's thoughts, why flesh might not be preserved in snow, as in salt. They were resolved they would try the experiment presently. They alighted out of the coach and went into a poore woman's...
Page 344 - Market for the sale of cattle, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington, in the county of Middlesex.
Page 223 - This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that JESUS CHRIST came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am chief.
Page 52 - Islington, where he was waiting for his sister, whom he had directed to meet him : there was then nothing of disorder discernible in his mind by any but himself; but he had withdrawn from study, and travelled with no other book than an English Testament, such as children cany to the school : when his friend took it into his hand, out of curiosity to see what companion a man of letters had chosen, ' I have but one book,' said Collins,
Page 146 - Its med'cinable herbs. Yea, oft alone, Piercing the long-neglected holy cave, The haunt obscure of old Philosophy, He bade with lifted torch its starry walls Sparkle, as erst they sparkled to the flame Of odorous Lamps tended by Saint and Sage. O framed for calmer times and nobler hearts ! O studious Poet, eloquent for truth ! Philosopher ! contemning wealth and death, Yet docile, childlike, full of Life and Love...
Page 369 - Now, all amid the rigours of the year, In the wild depth of Winter, while without The ceaseless winds blow ice, be my retreat, Between the groaning forest and the shore Beat by the boundless multitude of waves, A rural, shelter'd, solitary scene; Where ruddy fire and beaming tapers join, To cheer the gloom. There studious let me sit...
Page 35 - My sweet life, Now I have declared to you my mind for the settling of your state, I suppose that it were best for me to bethink and consider within myself what allowance were meetest for me : I pray and beseech you to grant to me, your most kind and loving wife, the sum of 2600/.

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