The Potter's Dictionary of Materials and Techniques

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University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004 - Ceramic materials - 437 pages
2 Reviews
The updated version of our comprehensive dictionary, covering all the terminology, materials and techniques for potters. It clearly and logically presents the potter with information on everything; the sources and character of materials, the behaviour of clays and glazes, forming methods and firing processes. This new edition covers recent developments, expands on previous subjects, and brings old entries up to date. New colour sections cover raku, maiolica, crystalline glazes, salt and soda, stoneware and porcelain, including graphs and diagrams where helpful. In short, the essential explanation of everything in the ceramic world.
  

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An excelent reference book. Comprehensive, and helpful in learning and understaning terms, glaze chemistry. A bit like wikipedia old style in that I get distracted just as easily by other interesting entries even when its not what I'm specifcally looking for. Stuff I regularly find it useful for
- Understanding content of other books [I find I use it for this a lot]
- Information on glaze ingredients and what they contain
- Understanding glaze chemistry, eg basics of how glazes work, how to do unity or serger calculations [see calculations, and formulas in the book] etc.
- the effects of different fluxes in the glaze
- different types of glaze effects eg magnesian matt glazes or lime matt glazes, or alkaline glazes.
It is alphabetical [it is a dictionary], but It has so far had almost everything I could want from it, and I have learnt a lot just from reading different bits of it.
I also almost constantly end up using the reference tables in the back of the book on things like
- chemical formulas and weights of a lot of different glaze ingredients. This has been surprisingly had to come by from other sources.
- basic visual guide to which fluxes are active in which temperatues
- limit formulas for the serger formula at different temperatures.
- guide to which elements are acidic/alkaline divided up in the periodic table.
please note this review is extreemly focused arround how it can help learning about glazes because thats mostly what I'm doing personally at the moment. The book also has a lot of stuff in it about clay and different techniques and problems you can encounter in pottery more generally too, its just that that isnt what I'm doing myself at the moment so I havent looked at it as much. I can only review the bits I've used so far.
 

Contents

Alphabetical Entries
1
Appendix of Tables 395
354
Standard abbreviations
396
Simplified ultimate analyses of some common materials
397
Harrison pyrometric cones
398
Orton pyrometric cones large and self supporting
399
Seger pyrometric cones
400
to 16 Tables concerning densities and contents of suspensions
401
Valency
412
Atomic to visible particle sizes compared with wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation
413
Periodic table of elements
414
7b Potters periodic table alkalineacidic oxides
415
Alternative oxide names
416
Analyses of some insulating refractories
417
Energy equivalents
418
Conversion scales
419

Elements
402
Slop weight equivalents
403
Oxide effect on surface tension
404
Effective ranges of glaze oxides
405
Mineral constants
406
Incandescence
411
Bibliography
420
Appendix of Suppliers
424
Appendix of Internet Resources for Potters 42 5
425
Recipe Appendix
427
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Well-known potters and teachers, they are both founder members of the South Wales Potters Group, and Frank has been a frequent contributor to numerous ceramic journals.

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