The Beautiful Room Is Empty: A Novel (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Sep 8, 2010 - Fiction - 240 pages
25 Reviews
When the narrator of White's poised yet scalding autobiographical novel first embarks on his sexual odyssey, it is the 1950s, and America is "a big gray country of families on drowsy holiday." That country has no room for a scholarly teenager with guilty but insatiable stirrings toward other men. Moving from a Midwestern college to the Stonewall Tavern on the night of the first gay uprising--and populated by eloquent queens, butch poseurs, and a fearfully incompetent shrink--The Beautiful Room is Empty conflates the acts of coming out and coming of age.

"With intelligence, candor, humor--and anger--White explores the most insidious aspects of oppression.... An impressive novel."--Washington Post book World
  

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Review: The Beautiful Room is Empty (The Edmund Trilogy #2)

User Review  - Neal - Goodreads

I first read this book about twenty years ago. Recently, it called to me again from my bookshelf. The language is often prose poetry, filled with honesty and humor. When I first read it so long ago, it was an awakening. Now, it's like meeting with an old friend to share fond memories. Read full review

Review: The Beautiful Room is Empty (The Edmund Trilogy #2)

User Review  - Center for Sex & Culture Library + Archives - Goodreads

Triangle Classics Edition with A BOY'S OWN STORY. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
35
Section 3
48
Section 4
71
Section 5
115
Section 6
145
Section 7
160
Section 8
186
Section 9
199
Section 10
209
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Edmund White is the author of the novels Fanny: A Fiction, A Boy's Own Story, The Farewell Symphony, and The Married Man; a biography of Jean Genet; a study of Marcel Proust; and, most recently, a memoir, My Lives. Having lived in Paris for many years, he has now settled in New York, and he teaches at Princeton University.

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