The Origin of Species (Google eBook)

Front Cover
P. F. Collier & Son, 1909 - Evolution - 551 pages
87 Reviews
First published in 1859, this landmark book on evolutionary biology was not the first to deal with the subject, but it went on to become a sensation—and a controversial one for many religious people who could not reconcile Darwin’s science with their faith. Darwin worked on the book for over 20 years before its publication. The radical crux of his scientific theory was the idea of natural selection, which meant that chance, not a divine Creator, played a great role in humanity's advancement and that individuals who weren't physically able to adapt with the greater populace died off.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
40
4 stars
22
3 stars
17
2 stars
4
1 star
4

Review: The Origin of Species

User Review  - Henry - Goodreads

Very interesting to see Darwin describe the original concept of evolution by natural selection. Our perspective has obviously grown much more sophisticated today, as even someone who is very much a ... Read full review

The BIBLE of Biology

User Review  - Preyas Pandya - Flipkart

A must have for every biology student. Charles Darwin has been an inspiration for aspiring biologists like me and several others. This book is a high level book and include all the meticulously researched and proven principles of evolution as suggested by Sir Charles Darwin. Amazing Book! Read full review

All 5 reviews »

Contents

I
25
II
58
III
76
IV
93
V
145
VI
178
VII
219
VIII
262
IX
296
X
333
XI
364
XII
395
XIII
427
XIV
450
XV
499
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 75 - I have taken some pains to estimate its probable minimum rate of natural increase; it will be safest to assume that it begins breeding when thirty years old, and goes on breeding till ninety years old, bringing forth six young in the interval, and surviving till one hundred years old; if this
Page 240 - development will probably appear to the reader a difficulty sufficient to overthrow my whole theory. I may here premise, that I have nothing to do with the origin of the mental powers, any more than I have with that of life itself. We are concerned only with the diversities of instinct and of the other mental faculties in
Page 80 - in several parts of the world insects determine the existence of cattle. Perhaps Paraguay offers the most curious instance of this; for here neither cattle nor horses nor dogs have ever run wild, though they swarm southward and northward in a feral state; and
Page 149 - a more general principle, namely, that natural selection is continually trying to economise every part of the organisation. If under changed conditions of life a structure, before useful, becomes less useful, its diminution will be favoured, for it will profit the individual not to have its nutriment wasted in building up an useless
Page 355 - in character. The inhabitants of the world at each successive period in its history have beaten their predecessors in the race for life, and are, in so far, higher in the scale, and their structure has generally become more specialised; and this may
Page 273 - feeding within the live bodies of caterpillars,—not as specially endowed or created instincts, but as small consequences of one general law leading to the advancement of all organic beings,—namely, multiply, vary, let the strongest live and the weakest die.
Page 460 - of modification, the slight differences characteristic of varieties of the same species, tend to be augmented into the greater differences characteristic of the species of the same genus. New and improved varieties will inevitably supplant and exterminate the older, less improved, and intermediate varieties ; and thus species are rendered to a large extent
Page 27 - change may be safely attributed to the domestic duck flying much less, and walking more, than its wild parents. The great and inherited development of the udders in cows and goats in countries where they are habitually milked, in
Page 76 - each generation or at recurrent intervals. Lighten any check, mitigate the destruction ever so little, and the number of the species will almost instantaneously increase to any amount. NATURE OF THE CHECKS TO INCREASE The
Page 90 - which she tends. Every selected character is fully exercised by her, as is implied by the fact of their selection. Man keeps the natives of many climates in the same country; he seldom exercises each

Bibliographic information