Swedish Knits: Classic and Modern Designs in the Scandinavian Tradition

Front Cover
Skyhorse Publishing Inc., 2009 - Crafts & Hobbies - 192 pages
3 Reviews
Everywhere you look, people are knitting. But why? While knitting has been around for centuries, this latest resurgence is less about the need to make and mend clothes and more about having an outlet for self-expression. Millions of people of all ages have realized that knitting is fun. It's also a great way to pass time, a way to clear your head and keep your hands busy while you think deep thoughts, and it's a great conversation starter.

Most of the time, your efforts result in something that is both functional and beautiful. For some, a knitting hobby develops into something meaningful—a way to reconnect with family members from different generations, a social activity (knitting circles are competing with book clubs all over the world), or even a source of revenue. The benefits and possibilities of knitting are infinite.

The Swedes have been avid knitters since the sixteenth century, creating richly textured garments that are both luxurious and practical. Here, two native Swedes offer their skills, patterns, and advice to a world of knitters hungry for new inspiration.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Swedish Knits: Classic and Modern Designs in the Scandinavian Tradition

User Review  - Wendy - Goodreads

SO MANY PATTERNS! Plus, a lot of interesting stuff about different types of yarn. Also, if I ever come across a pattern in Swedish, this has all of the Swedish translations for terms in patterns as well. :) Read full review

Review: Swedish Knits: Classic and Modern Designs in the Scandinavian Tradition

User Review  - Catherine - Goodreads

A very attractive book, a few garment patterns, one or two other and some stitch patterns. This book has a decent section on technique with lots of illustrations. There didn't seem to be much 'Swedishness' about it as most of the patterns seemed English to me. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Basics to Build On
7
Casting On
9
Knits and Purls
12
Rib Stitch and Moss Stitch
14
Increases
16
Decreases
18
Casting Off
20
A Quick Lesson in Crocheting
22
Dropped Stitches
122
Split Yarn and Other Common Mistakes
124
Cables Twisted the Wrong Way
125
How to Rip Out
126
Too Large or Too Small
127
Not All Mistakes Have to Be Fixed
128
Finishing and Care
131
Preparations
132

Yarn Accessories and Preparations
27
YarnTypes and Qualities
29
SYNTHETIC YARNS
32
BALLS AND HANKS
33
Yarn Labels
34
Needles
35
NEEDLE SIZES
36
Other More or Less Necessary Accessories
37
Get Organized
40
Prepare Your Knitting
41
The Garment
45
Cardigan with Embroidered Collar and Cuffs
49
Advanced Knitting
53
Patterns with Knits and Purls
54
Rib Stitch
59
Textured Patterns
62
Crossed and Dropped Stitches
66
Cables
70
Holes and Lace
82
Edges and Details
90
KNITTED EDGES
91
CROCHETED EDGES
94
TIED EDGES
95
APPLIQUED EDGES
97
SLITS
100
SHORT ROWS
102
CINCHES
103
POCKETS
104
ZIPPERS
106
Knitting m the Ronnd
107
Knitting in Different Colors
110
Decorate Your Knitting
115
Beads and Sequins
116
Embroidery
118
Averting Disaster
121
Stitching Pieces Together
133
Keep Your Knitted Garments Clean
134
Storage
135
Creating Your Own Patterns
137
Preparations
138
Writing Down a Pattern
142
Interpret a Pattern
145
Common Abbreviations
146
Terms
147
Diagrams
148
Rediscover Old Patterns
149
Patterns
151
Simple Stockinette Stitch Sweater
153
Sweater Vest
154
Sweater from Bohuslan
156
Traditional Norwegian Lusekofta from Setesdal
159
Turtleneck with Norwegian Pattern
162
Zigzag Patterned Dress
165
Cable Sweater in Tweed
166
Lace Poncho
169
Cardigan with Vertical DropStitch
170
Cardigan with Indian Cross Stitches
172
Long Dress with Cables
174
Nicoles Sweater
176
Sweater in Lace
178
NorwegianInspired Childrens Sweater
180
Shawl
181
Fmgerless Gloves
183
Bedspread in Squares
184
Pillow
186
Tea Cozy
187
Evening Bag in Gold
188
Dog Jacket
189
Index
190
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Pamela Hammerskog began knitting as a thirteen-year-old, when her home economics teacher told her that as long as you know how to knit and purl, you can knit just about anything. Paula tried it and has been knitting ever since. She lives in Stockholm, Sweden

Eva Wincent started knitting in earnest as an adult, when she answered an ad in the newspaper: “Seeking knitting partner for textile shop." She has now been running her own business, Wincent, for twenty years and is well known among knitters. She lives in Stockholm, Sweden.

Bibliographic information