The London Medical and Physical Journal, Volume 60 (Google eBook)

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J. Souter, 1828
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Page 417 - Every act of sensation, when duly considered, gives us an equal view of both parts of nature, the corporeal and spiritual. For whilst I know, by seeing or hearing, &c., that there is some corporeal being without me, the object of that sensation, I do more certainly know, that there is some spiritual being within me that sees and hears.
Page 192 - I once used it,) without the liquor plumbi, it dissolves more rapidly ; when usedj the powdered nitrate< falls into the fold of the conjunctiva, or rests on the lid, and is apt to cause a slough, which is prevented by adding the lead. The manner of using either ointment is by introducing between the lids a portion, larger or smaller as the case may seem to require it, from the size of a large pin's head to that of a garden pea.
Page 366 - Persons desirous of admission are to send in their applications in writing (specifying their Christian and surnames, rank or profession, and places of abode) to the principal librarian, or, in his absence, to the senior...
Page 474 - I found Dr. Gall (in 1826) to be a man of middle stature, of an outline well-proportioned ; he was thin and rather pallid, and possessed a capacious head and chest. The peculiar brilliancy of his penetrating eye left an indelible impression. His countenance was remarkable, his features strongly marked and rather large, yet devoid of coarseness. The general impression that a first glance was calculated to convey would be, that Dr. Gall was a man of originality and depth of mind, possessing much...
Page 377 - To this it may be replied 1st, that even were the force of this objection to a certain degree admitted, yet that, to judge fairly of the plan, its inconveniences must be compared with those of the existing system ; which system, according to the evidence adduced, is liable in a great measure to the same objection, since the bodies exhumated are principally those of the poor ; 2dly, that the evils...
Page 351 - Repeated copious blood-letting is of itself adequate to produce a hardness of the pulse, which we shall in vain endeavour to subdue by persevering in the same system of treatment. In many individuals it will produce head-ache and confusion of mind, not very different from what the injury itself had previously occasioned. These things may be observed especially in young females who are disposed to hysteria ; and whom I have often known to suffer from a continued aggravation of such symptoms as I have...
Page 372 - ... resort to this expedient, lest dissection in London should be abandoned altogether. The loss which they sustain is made good out of the fees which they receive for attendance on their lectures in the anatomical theatre. The cost of providing subjects is also enhanced to the teacher, by his being required occasionally to defend the exhumator against legal prosecution, and to maintain him against want, if sentenced to imprisonment, and his family, in case he has one, until the period of his punishment...
Page 473 - Every person intending to offer himself for examination must give notice in writing to the clerk of the Society on or before the Monday previously to the day of examination, and must...
Page 372 - The general result has been, with some difference, according to differences of place and season (sometimes owing to the caprice and mercenary motives of the agents employed, at other times owing to the real difficulty of obtaining a supply), that of late subjects have been to be procured either not at all, or in very insufficient quantity, and at prices most oppressive to the teacher and student. The price of a subject about thirty years ago was from one to two guineas ; the teacher now pays from...
Page 457 - Were I to allege one cause, which I thought was operating with more force than another, to increase the victims of insanity, I should pronounce, that it was the overweaning zeal with which it is attempted to impress on youth the subtile distinctions of theology and an unrelenting devotion to a dubious doctrine.

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