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Books Books 1 - 10 of 18 on II Therefore to the same natural effects we must, as far as possible, assign the....  
" II Therefore to the same natural effects we must, as far as possible, assign the same causes. "
Elements of Natural Philosophy: Being an Experimental Introduction to the ... - Page 39
by Golding Bird - 1848 - 402 pages
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A treatise on astronomy

Olinthus Gilbert Gregory - 1802
...phenomena. RULE II. Therefore to the same natural effects we must alu'ciys assign, as far as possible, the same causes. RULE III. The qualities of bodies which admit neither retention nor remission of degrees, and which are found to belong to all bodies within the reach of...
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Antologia: giornale di scienze, lettere e arti, Volume 33

Gino Capponi - 1829
...inteso da Newton. Ecco le parole originali di questo filosofo. The qualities of bodies , which minii t neither intension nor remission of degrees, and which are found to belong to ali bodies within the reach ofour experimenti , are to be esteemed the umvERSAL qualities of ali bodies...
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Elements of chemistry: in the order of the lectures given in Yale College

Benjamin Silliman - Chemistry - 1830 - 1274 pages
...such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances." ( h.) " Therefore, to the same, natural effects we must, as far as possible, assign the same causes."^ (i.) The range of human reason is the whole extent of second causes. (_/.) The final reason of a particular...
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Elements of Somatology: A Treatise on the General Properties of Matter

George Macintosh Maclean - Physics - 1859 - 124 pages
...than such as are both true and sufficient to explain the appearances. " II. Therefore, to the same natural effects we must, as far as possible, assign the same causes. "III. Such qualities of -bodies as are not capable of increase or decrease, and which are found to...
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PROBLEMS OF LIFE AND MIND.

GEORGE HENRY LEWES - 1874
...has expressed himself timidly on this point in his enunciation of the Eule : " Therefore to the same natural effects we must as far as possible assign the same causes." The unalterable rigor of the canon is necessary to the integrity of the conception of every phenomenon...
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The New Physics: Sound

Joseph Battell - Sound - 1909 - 274 pages
...pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes. RULE II. Therefore to the same natural effects we must, as far as possible, assign the same causes. RULE IV. In experimental philosophy we are to look upon propositions collected by general induction from...
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Eighteenth-Century Philosophy

Lewis White Beck - Philosophy - 1966 - 321 pages
...pleased with simplicity, and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes. RULE II Therefore to the same natural effects we must, as far as possible, assign the same causes. As to respiration in a man and in a beast; the descent of stones in Europe and in America; the light...
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The Understanding of Nature: Essays in the Philosophy of Biology

Marjorie Grene - Medical - 1974 - 374 pages
...such as are both true, and sufficient to explain their appearances. Rule II. Therefore to the same natural effects we must, as far as possible, assign the same causes. As to respiration in a man and in a beast; the descent of stones in Europe and in America; the light...
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The how and the why: An Essay on the Origins and Development of Physical Theory

David Park - Science - 1990 - 459 pages
...pleased with simplicity, and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes. II. Therefore to the sanie natural effects we must as far as possible assign the same causes. As to respiration in a man and in a beast; the descent of stones in F.urope and America; the light...
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A History of Astronomy

Anton Pannekoek - Science - 1989 - 521 pages
...things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances; (2) Therefore to the same natural effects we must, as far as possible, assign the same causes. These rules in modern times may look superfluous and artificial; but, in a century in which so many...
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