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Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on To this purpose the philosophers say that Nature does nothing in vain, and more is....  
" To this purpose the philosophers say that Nature does nothing in vain, and more is in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity, and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes. "
Elements of Natural Philosophy: Being an Experimental Introduction to the ... - Page 39
by Golding Bird - 1848 - 402 pages
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Principles of natural philosophy, or, A new theory of physics: founded on ...

Thomas Exley - Physics - 1829 - 478 pages
...; and when they are found adequate to this purpose, the principles themselves are established. RULE I. " We are to admit no more causes of natural things,...explain their appearances." RULE II. " Therefore, to the same natural effects we must, as far as possible, assign 'the same causes." RULE III. " The qualities...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of science, art ...

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington)
...preliminary to this part, he lays down the following rules for reasoning in natural philosophy : 1. We are to admit no more causes of natural things than...such as are both true and sufficient to explain their natural appearances. 2. Therefore to the same natural effects we must always assign, as far as possible,...
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A Review of the Doctrine of a Vital Principle,: As Maintained by Some ...

James Cowles Prichard - Science - 1829 - 236 pages
...philosophizing, that "we are to admit no more causes of natural things, or of the phenomena of Nature, than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances." " Causas rerum naturalium non plures admitti debere, quam quae et verffi sint et earum phsenomenis...
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Elements of chemistry: in the order of the lectures given in Yale College

Benjamin Silliman - Chemistry - 1830 - 1274 pages
...provisionally, until somediing better can be done.* (g.) We will add from Sir Isaac Newton, dial, " we are to admit no more causes of natural things,...true and sufficient to explain their appearances." ( h.) " Therefore, to the same, natural effects we must, as far as possible, assign the same causes."^...
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Lectures on logic: or on the science of evidence : generally embracing both ...

Francis William Newman - Philosophy - 1838 - 192 pages
...more causes of natural things, or of the phenomena 1 Prichard on a Vital Principle, p. 21. of nature, than such as are both true, and sufficient to explain their appearances. This has been received as one of the fundamental laws of reasoning by natural philosophers; and a deduction...
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Elements of Somatology: A Treatise on the General Properties of Matter

George Macintosh Maclean - Physics - 1859 - 124 pages
...the shortest and safest way to the attainment of true and useful knowledge, are as follows : " I. We are to admit no more causes of natural things,...than such as are both true and sufficient to explain the appearances. " II. Therefore, to the same natural effects we must, as far as possible, assign the...
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Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

American Association for the Advancement of Science - Science - 1871
...reduction of bulk. Hence, if we adopt the first philosophical rule of Newton to " admit no more causes of things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances," we must discard the notion of impenetrability as one of those supposed causes which have become unnecessary...
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Criticism on the Theological Idea of Deity: Contrasting the Views ...

M. B. Craven - God - 1871 - 317 pages
...will serve, apparently endorses Aristotelian sentiment by saying, " We are to admit no more causes for natural things, than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearance ;" on the ground that Nature is pleased with simplicity, and affects not the pomp of superfluous...
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Summarized Proceedings ... and a Directory of Members

American Association for the Advancement of Science - Science - 1871
...reduction of bulk. Hence, if we adopt the first philosophical rule of Newton to " admit no more causes of things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances," we must discard the notion of impenetrability as one of those supposed causes which have become unnecessary...
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PROBLEMS OF LIFE AND MIND.

GEORGE HENRY LEWES - 1874
...interpretation of a phenomenon must be the interpretation of it in terras of Feeling. EULE V. " We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true, and sufficient to explain the appearances" REMARK. This is Newton's First Eule ; and, though not expressed with perfect precision,...
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