Simplicius on the Planets and Their Motions: In Defense of a Heresy

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BRILL, Nov 29, 2012 - Science - 329 pages
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Though the digression closing Simplicius commentary on Aristotle s "De caelo" 2.12 has long been misread as a history of early Greek planetary theory, it is in fact a creative reading of Aristotle to maintain the authority of the "De caelo" as a sacred text in Late Platonism and to refute the polemic mounted by the Christian, John Philoponus. This book shows that the critical question forced on Simplicius was whether his school s acceptance of Ptolemy s planetary hypotheses entailed a rejection of Aristotle s argument that the heavens are made of a special matter that moves by nature in a circle about the center of the cosmos and, thus, a repudiation of the thesis that the cosmos is uncreated and everlasting.
  

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Contents

Introduction
3
Chapter One The Heresy of NonHomocentric Aetherial Motion
27
Chapter Two The Heretical Rejection of All Hypotheses
37
Chapter Three Simplicius the Apologist
59
Chapter Four Simplicius the Historian
73
Chapter Five Conclusion
91
Translation
95
In Aristotelis de caelo 210
97
Figures
179
Comments
199
In de caelo 210
201
In de caelo 211
217
In de caelo 212
223
Bibliography
299
Index of Passages
313
Index of Names
325

In Aristotelis de caelo 211
111
In Aristotelis de caelo 212
119

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About the author (2012)

Alan C. Bowen, Ph.D. (1977) Philosophy, University of Toronto, is Director of the Institute for Research in Classical Philosophy and Science (Princeton). He has numerous publications in the history of science and philosophy, including "New Perspectives on Aristotle s" De caelo (with Christian Wildberg).

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