Tryon's Letters, Domestick and Foreign: To Several Persons of Quality: Occasionally Distributed in Subjects, Viz., Philosophical, Theological, and Moral (Google eBook)

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Printd for G. Conyers, 1700 - Conduct of life - 240 pages
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Page 201 - Servants [or slaves] night and day stand in great Boyling Houses, where there are Six or Seven large Coppers or Furnaces kept perpetually Boyling; and from which with heavy Ladles and Scummers they Skim off the excrementitious parts of the Canes, till it comes to its perfection and cleanness, while...
Page 52 - The excellency of bricks consists chiefly in the first and last operation ; for bricks made of good earth, and well tempered, become solid and ponderous, and therefore will take up a longer time in drying and burning than our common bricks seem to require. It is also to be observed that the well drying of bricks, before they are burned, prevents cracking and crumbling in their burning ; for when the bricks are too wet, the parts are prevented from adhering together. The best way of ordering the fire...
Page 56 - Tempering very high, till it becomes smooth and yielding, tough and glewy. Then the Ground being levelled, lay your Floor therewith about two and a half, or three Inches thick, making it smooth with a Trowel: The hotter the Season is, the better; and when it is thoroughly dry'd, it will continue Time out of Mind.
Page 51 - ... to the flour, and well wrought up together, such bread becomes not only smooth and firm, without having eyes or being subject to crumbling, but it eats sweeter and mellower, and becomes easier of digestion, affording far better nourishment than such as is over watered, heavy, and not sufficiently tempered ; provided the other operations, which belong to the making of good bread, such as baking, &c. be properly performed. Bricks thus tempered become solid, smooth, hard and durable ; and one brick...
Page 198 - ... in this excess of Drinking, at the same time proves very frequently your Disappointment, and their Death : And as you cannot but be convinced of the truth hereof, so I appeal to your own experience, whether your allowing of Polygamy, or plurality of Wives to your Black Slaves, doth any ways answer your end in the multiplication of Servants thereby, I very much doubt the contrary, and that 'tis the ready way to lose both the Root and Branch, nothing being more destructive to Humane Nature, than...
Page 65 - Great, fo that the Power of the Eternal Son of God and Fountain of all Beings, is not limited to any...
Page 204 - Now the Scums, Dregs and excrementitious Parts [of the sugar-cane juice] which are separated from the finer and more essential parts, in making of Sugar are of some value, for from the same being fermented and distilled, is extracted a strong Spirit which they call Rumm; so that you see Sir that the Juice of the Cane, by Art and extream Labour is made into three considerable Commodities, viz, Sugar, Treacle and Rumm, beside which the Servants and Negroes, make a very good Drink with Molosses, Water...
Page 57 - ... Houses. But if any would have more beautiful Floors than these, they must lay their Floors even, smooth, and fine, either with the first or last mentioned Flooring; then take Lime made of Rag-Stones, and temper it with a little Whites of Eggs, the more Eggs the better, to a very high pitch, with which cover your Floor about a quarter or half an Inch thick, before the under Flooring be too dry, that they...
Page 119 - And these secret and wonderful Operations cannot be performed any other way, but only by the five great Princes or compleat governors, called Senses; the Creator hath appointed each of them its province and government, who are always ready and on their Guard to defend the Tree of Life, that is, that nothing should be communicated to the Central parts of Nature that...

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