Programming Language Pragmatics, Volume 1

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Morgan Kaufmann, 2006 - Computers - 875 pages
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The innovative approach of the first edition of Programming Language Pragmatics provided students with an integrated view of programming language design and implementation, while offering a solid teaching text on timely language topics in a rigorous yet accessible style.

The new edition carries on these distinctive features as well as the signature tradition of illustrating the most recent developments in programming language design with a variety of modern programming languages.



  • Addresses the most recent developments in programming language design, including C99, C#, and Java 5
  • Introduces and discusses scripting languages throughout the book as well as in an entire new chapter
  • Includes a comprehensive chapter on concurrency, with coverage of the new Java concurrency package (JSR 166) and the comparable mechanisms in C#
  • Updates many sections and topics, including iterators, exceptions, polymorphism, templates/generics, scope rules and declaration ordering, separate compilation, garbage collection, and threads and synchronization
  • Highlights the interaction and tradeoffs inherent in language design and language implementation decisions with over 100 "Design and Implementation" call-out boxes
  • Adds end-of-chapter "Exploration" exercises-open-ended, research-type activities
  • Provides review questions after sections for quick self-assessment
  • Includes over 800 numbered examples to help the reader quickly cross-reference and access content
  

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Contents

Part I Foundations
1
Part II Core Issues in Language Design
231
Part III Alternative Programming Models
521
Part IV A Closer Look at Implementation
759
Appendix A Programming Languages Mentioned
793
Appendix B Language Design and Language Implementation
803
Appendix C Numbered Examples
807
Bibliography
819
Index
837
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Michael L. Scott is a professor in the University of Rochester's Department of Computer Science, which he chaired from 1996 to 1999. He is the designer of the Lynx distributed programming language and a co-designer of the Charlotte and Psyche parallel operating systems, the Bridge parallel file system, the Cashmere distributed shared memory system, and the MCS mutual exclusion lock. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1985.

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