The philosophy of natural theology, an essay which obtained a prize at Oxford, Nov. 26th, 1872 (Google eBook)

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1874
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Page 379 - Stern lawgiver ! yet thou dost wear The Godhead's most benignant grace; Nor know we anything so fair As is the smile upon thy face: Flowers laugh before thee on their beds, And fragrance in thy footing treads; Thou dost preserve the Stars from wrong; And the most ancient Heavens, through thee, are fresh and strong.
Page 85 - When we run over libraries, persuaded of these principles, what havoc must we make? If we take in our hand any volume; of divinity or school metaphysics, for instance; let us ask, Does it contain any abstract reasoning concerning quantity or number'} No. Does it contain any experimental reasoning concerning matter of fact and existence? No. Commit it then to the flames: for it can contain nothing but sophistry and illusion.
Page 223 - ... his ways are not as our ways, nor his thoughts as our thoughts.
Page 16 - Superior beings, when of late they saw A mortal man unfold all Nature's law, ' Admir'd such wisdom in an earthly shape, And show'da Newton as we show an ape.
Page 243 - Was war ein Gott, der nur von außen stieße, Im Kreis das All am Finger laufen ließe! Ihm ziemt's, die Welt im Innern zu bewegen, Natur in Sich, Sich in Natur zu hegen, So daß, was in Ihm lebt und webt und ist, Nie Seine Kraft, nie Seinen Geist vermißt.
Page 185 - For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can ORSERVE anything but the perception.
Page 378 - But thee I now would serve more strictly, if I may. Through no disturbance of my soul, Or strong...
Page 184 - THERE are some philosophers who imagine we are every moment intimately conscious of what we call our self; that we feel its existence and its continuance in existence; and are certain, beyond the evidence of a demonstration, both of its perfect identity and simplicity.
Page 312 - For take an example of a dog, and mark what a generosity and courage he will put on when he finds himself maintained by a man, who to him is instead of a God, or melior natura, which courage is manifestly such as that creature, without that confidence, of a better nature than his own could never attain. So man, when he resteth and assureth himself upon divine protection and favor, gathereth a force and faith which human nature in itself could not obtain.
Page 2 - FLOWER in the crannied wall, I pluck you out of the crannies ; — Hold you here, root and all, in my hand, Little flower — but if I could understand What you are, root and all, and all in all, I should know what God and man is.

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