Out in psychology: lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer perspectives

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Wiley, 2007 - Social Science - 473 pages
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There has been a recent explosion of interest in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans Perspective Psychology amongst students and academics, and this interest is predicted to continue to rise. Recent media debates on subjects such as same-sex marriage have fuelled interest in LGBTQ perspectives. This edited collection showcases the latest thinking in LGBTQ psychology. The book has 21 chapters covering subjects such as same sex parenting, outing, young LGBTQ people, sport, learning disabilities, lesbian and gay identities etc. The book has an international focus, with contributors from UK, US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand

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Contents

Introducing Out in Psychology
1
Invitations to Paradox
38
Power Privilege
59
Copyright

15 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

Victoria Clarke is a senior lecturer in social psychology at the University of the West of England, Bristol, UK. She has published a number of papers on lesbian and gay parenting, same-sex relationships, the history of LGBTQ psychologies, and qualitative methods in journals such as Sexualities, British Journal of Social Psychology, Qualitative Research in Psychology and Lesbian & Gay Psychology Review. She has edited (with Sara-Jane Finlay and Sue Wilkinson) two special issues of Feminism & Psychology on marriage, and edited (with Elizabeth Peel) special issues of Feminism & Psychology, Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy, Lesbian & Gay Psychology Review and Psychology of Women Section Review on LGBTQ psychologies. She is also the editor with Elizabeth Peel and Jack Drescher of British LGB Psychologies: Theory, research and practice (Haworth Press, 2007). She is a member of the British Psychological Societyís Lesbian & Gay Psychology Section and Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section. She is an editorial board member of the Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy and Feminism & Psychology. Her current research and writing centres on same-sex relational practices and civil partnership, LGBTQ issues in higher education, and the use of thematic analysis in qualitative psychological research. She is co-authoring a textbook (with Sonja J. Ellis, Elizabeth Peel and Damien W. Riggs) entitled LGBTQ Psychologies: Themes and perspectives (Cambridge University Press).

Elizabeth Peel is a lecturer in psychology in the School of Life & Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, UK. She has published a number of articles about heterosexism, diversity training and lesbian and gay relationships in journals such as Discourse & Society, Feminism & Psychology, Lesbian & Gay Psychology Review and Womenís Studies International Forum. She is the editor with Victoria Clarke and Jack Drescher of British LGB Psychologies: Theory, research and practice (Haworth Press, 2007). She has also edited (with Victoria Clarke) special issues of Feminism & Psychology, Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy, Lesbian & Gay Psychology Review and Psychology of Women Section Review on LGBTQ psychologies. She is a chartered psychologist and a member of the British Psychological Societyís Lesbian and Gay Psychology Section and Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section. She is former editor of Lesbian & Gay Psychology Review and editorial board member of the Journal of Gay and Lesbian Psychotherapy. Her current research centres on the management of chronic illness (especially diabetes), understandings of health related technologies (such as neuroimaging techniques), same sex relationships and the intersections of LGBTQ psychologies and critical health psychology. She is currently editing (with Michael Thomson) a special issue of Feminism & Psychology on LGBTQ health psychologies and is co-authoring a textbook (with Victoria Clarke, Sonja J. Ellis and Damien W. Riggs) entitled LGBTQ Psychologies: Themes and perspectives (Cambridge University Press).

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