Mississippi, as a Province, Territory, and State: With Biographical Notices of Eminent Citizens, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Power & Barksdale, 1880 - Mississippi - 545 pages
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145-146.

Contents

I
1
II
12
III
17
IV
22
V
27
VI
35
VII
42
VIII
51
XVIII
150
XIX
160
XX
178
XXI
202
XXII
220
XXIII
245
XXIV
258
XXV
295

IX
57
X
63
XI
86
XII
92
XIII
102
XIV
112
XV
117
XVI
125
XVII
135
XXVI
306
XXVII
315
XXVIII
333
XXIX
347
XXX
361
XXXI
415
XXXII
467
XXXIII
483

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Page 353 - I am compelled to declare it as my deliberate opinion, that, if this bill passes, the bonds of this Union are virtually dissolved; that the States which compose it are free from their moral obligations, and that, as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some, to prepare definitely for a separation; amicably if they can, violently if they must.
Page 224 - The day that France takes possession of New Orleans, fixes the sentence which is to restrain her forever within her low-water mark. It seals the union of two nations, who, in conjunction, can maintain exclusive possession of the ocean. From that moment we must marry ourselves to the British fleet and nation.
Page 80 - Lake, and the water communication between it and the Lake of the Woods, to the said Lake of the Woods; thence through the said lake to the most northwestern point thereof, and from thence on a due west course to the river Mississippi; thence by a line to be drawn along the middle of the said river Mississippi until it shall intersect the northernmost part of the thirty-first degree of north latitude.
Page 80 - Mississippi; thence by a line to be drawn along the middle of the said River Mississippi until it shall intersect the northernmost part of the thirty-first degree of north latitude. South by a line to be drawn due east from the determination of the line last mentioned, in the latitude of thirty-one degrees north of the equator, to the middle of the River Apalachicola or Catahouche: thence along the middle thereof to its junction with the Flint River; thence straight to the head of St.
Page xxii - April, one thousand, six hundred and eighty-two, in virtue of the commission of his Majesty, which I hold in my hand, and which may be seen by all whom it may concern, have taken and do now take in the name of his Majesty and of his successors to the crown, possession of this country of Louisiana...
Page xxii - Koroas, which are the most considerable nations dwelling therein, with whom also we have made alliance, either by ourselves or by others in our behalf; as far as its mouth at the sea, or Gulf of Mexico, about the twenty-seventh degree of the elevation of the North Pole, and also to the mouth of the River of Palms ; upon the assurance which we have received from all these nations, that we are the first Europeans who have descended or ascended the said River Colbert...
Page 198 - If any bill shall not be returned by the President within ten days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the congress by their adjournment prevent its return, in which case it shall not be a law.
Page 81 - That in case the said state shall authorize her delegates in Congress to make a cession of all her territorial claims to lands west of the river Apalachicola, or west of a meridian line running through or near the point where that river intersects the thirty-first degree of north latitude, and shall omit the last proviso in her said act, and shall so far vary the proviso respecting the sum of...
Page xxii - Europeans who have descended or ascended the said river Colbert ; hereby protesting against all those who may in future undertake to invade any or all of these countries, people, or lands above described, to the prejudice of the right of his Majesty, acquired by the consent of the nations herein named. Of which, and of all that can le needed, I hereby take to witness those who hear me, and demand an act of the Notary as required by law.
Page 522 - Alleganies that has since been amply corroborated. Not only did he do this, but finding coal on the banks of the Ohio, he purchased and opened mines of the mineral ; and so confident was he of the success of the project on hand, that he caused supplies of the fuel to be heaped upon the shore, in anticipation of the wants of a steamboat whose keel had yet to be laid...

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