Geographies of Nature: Societies, Environments, Ecologies (Google eBook)

Front Cover
SAGE, Oct 2, 2007 - Science - 224 pages
1 Review
"An exemplary introduction to cutting edge work on the geographies of nature. Intellectually demanding, clearly written and empirically rich, this is a book that deserves a wide readership within and beyond the geographical discipline."
- Sarah J. Whatmore, Oxford University Centre for the Environment

Geographies of Nature introduces readers to conventional understandings of nature - realist, environmental, constructivist - while examining alternative accounts from different disciplines where nature resists easy classification. Accessibly written, it demonstrates how recent thinking has urgent relevance and impact on the ways in which we approach environmental problems. The text:

  • Makes concepts like 'environment', 'conservation', and 'sustainability' accessible and applicable with the extensive use of case studies.
  • Uses text boxes to introduce readers to debates and ideas.
  • Grounds the reader and proceeds to the explanation of more complex arguments progressively.

Geographies of Nature presents a new kind of environmental analysis, one that refuses to view nature as wholly separate to the human and nonhuman practices through which it is constantly made and remade.

 

  

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Contents

Part I What are Geographies of Nature?
5
1 Natures reality
7
2 The thought of Nature
23
3 Towards the coproduction of nature and society
35
4 Hybrid natures
47
5 Geographies of nature and difference
61
Part II How and Why Geographies of Nature Matter?
77
6 First things? Nature and the sciences
79
7 Securing natures
102
8 Conserving natures
124
9 Animals and environments
150
10 Environmental policies and sustainabilities
165
Afterword
188
Bibliography
193
Index
204
Copyright

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Page 9 - The ease with which anti-environmental forces like the wise-use movement have attacked such singlespecies preservation efforts suggests the vulnerability of strategies like these. Perhaps partly because our own conflicts over such places and organisms have become so messy, the convergence of wilderness values with concerns about biological diversity and endangered species has helped produce a deep fascination for remote ecosystems, where it is easier to imagine that nature might somehow be "left...
Page 9 - left alone" to flourish by its own pristine devices. The classic example is the tropical rain forest, which since the 1970s has become the most powerful modern icon of unfallen, sacred land - a veritable Garden of Eden - for many Americans and Europeans. And yet protecting the rain forest in the eyes of First World environmentalists all too often means protecting it from the people who live there. Those who seek to preserve such "wilderness...
Page 9 - ... values with concerns about biological diversity and endangered species has helped produce a deep fascination for remote ecosystems, where it is easier to imagine that nature might somehow be "left alone" to flourish by its own pristine devices. The classic example is the tropical rain forest, which since the 1970s has become the most powerful modern icon of unfallen, sacred land - a veritable Garden of Eden - for many Americans and Europeans.
Page 13 - Animals grazing peacefully on a hillside, waves lapping gently up the pebble beach, a pine forest whistling in a storm, a river bursting its banks, a hurricane tossing houses and cars in the air like play-things, a bush fire raging out of control — all are images of nature, some idyllic others threatening. Can we be sure, however, that this is nature in the conventional meaning of the word, that is, the result of forces uncontaminated by human activity and production? What becomes of this understanding...

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