Essays: second series (Google eBook)

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J. Munroe and Co., 1844 - 313 pages
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Page 311 - ... reward : whether thy work be fine or coarse, planting corn, or writing epics, so only it be honest work, done to thine own approbation, it shall earn a reward to the senses as well as to the thought : no matter, how often defeated, you are born to victory. The reward of a thing well done, is to have done it...
Page 46 - Wherever snow falls or water flows or birds fly, wherever day and night meet in twilight, wherever the blue heaven is hung by clouds or sown with stars, wherever are forms with transparent boundaries, wherever are outlets into celestial space, wherever is danger, and awe, and love there is Beauty, plenteous as rain, shed for thee, and though thou shouldst walk the world over, thou shalt not be able to find a condition inopportune or ignoble.
Page 29 - It Is a secret which every Intellectual man quickly learns, that, beyond the energy of his possessed and conscious intellect, he Is capable of a new energy (as of an Intellect doubled on itself), by abandonment to the nature of things; that, beside his privacy of power as an Individual man, there Is a great public power, on which he can draw...
Page 193 - Man is fallen ; nature is erect and serves as a differential thermometer, detecting the presence or absence of the divine sentiment in man.
Page 277 - The ox must be taken from the plough, and the horse from the cart, the hundred acres of the farm must be spaded, and the man must walk wherever boats and locomotives will not carry him. Even the insect world was to be defended, that had been too long neglected, and a society for the protection of ground-worms, slugs, and mosquitoes was to be incorporated without delay.
Page 7 - The poet is the person in whom these powers are in balance, the man without impediment, who sees and handles that which others dream of, traverses the whole scale of experience, and is representative of man, in virtue of being the largest power to receive and to impart.
Page 22 - As the eyes of Lyncseus were said to see through the earth, so the poet turns the world to glass, and shows us all things in their right series and procession.
Page 27 - Over everything stands its daemon or soul, and, as the form of the thing is reflected by the eye, so the soul of the thing is reflected by a melody. The sea, the mountain-ridge, Niagara, and every flower-bed, pre-exist, or super-exist, in pre-cantations...
Page 236 - To educate the wise man the State exists, and with the appearance of the wise man the State expires. The appearance of character makes the State unnecessary. The wise man is the State. He needs no army, fort, or navy he loves men too well ; no bribe, or feast, or palace, to draw friends to him; no vantage ground, no favorable circumstance.
Page 184 - The solitary places do not seem quite lonely. At the gates of the forest, the surprised man of the world is forced to leave his city estimates of great and small, wise and foolish. The knapsack of custom falls off his back with the first step he makes into these precincts. Here is sanctity which shames our religions, and reality which discredits our heroes. Here we find Nature to be the circumstance which dwarfs every other circumstance, and judges like a god all men that come to her.

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