The London encyclopaedia: or, Universal dictionary of science, art, literature, and practical mechanics, comprising a popular view of the present state of knowledge. Illustrated by numerous engravings, a general atlas, and appropriate diagrams, Volume 21 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Thomas Curtis
Printed for T. Tegg, 1829 - Encyclopedias and dictionaries
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1829 voir planche page 696

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Page 342 - Religion agreed upon by the Archbishops and Bishops of both provinces, and the whole Clergy in the Convocation holden at London, in the year of our Lord God...
Page 422 - Of the Lord's Supper. THE Supper of the Lord is not only a sign of the love that Christians ought to have among themselves one to another ; but rather it is a Sacrament of our redemption by Christ's death : insomuch that to such as rightly, worthily, and with faith, receive the same, the bread which we break, is a partaking of the Body of Christ ; and likewise the cup of blessing is a partaking of the Blood of Christ.
Page 139 - I intend, in many cases, to employ the expansive force of steam to press on the pistons, or whatever may be used instead of them, in the same manner as the pressure of the atmosphere is now employed in common fire engines.
Page 321 - But he that hateth his brother is in darkness, and walketh in darkness, and knoweth not whither he goeth, because that darkness hath blinded his eyes.
Page 23 - Making it momentary as a sound, Swift as a shadow, short as any dream ; Brief as the lightning in the collied night, That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth. And ere a man hath power to say, — Behold ! The jaws of darkness do devour it up : So quick bright things come to confusion.
Page 37 - Orpheus with his lute made trees, And the mountain-tops that freeze, Bow themselves, when he did sing : To his music, plants and flowers Ever sprung : as sun and showers There had made a lasting spring.
Page 33 - And he gave it for his opinion, that whoever could make two ears of corn, or two blades of grass to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to his country than the whole race of politicians put together.
Page 9 - Rise on the earth ; or earth rise on the sun • He from the east his flaming road begin; Or she from west her silent course advance, With inoffensive pace that spinning sleeps On her soft axle, while she paces even, And bears thee soft with the smooth air along; Solicit not thy thoughts with matters hid; Leave them to God above.
Page 320 - Grief fills the room up of my absent child, Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me, Puts on his pretty looks, repeats his words, Remembers me of all his gracious parts, Stuffs out his vacant garments with his form; Then, have I reason to be fond of grief ? Fare you well: had you such a loss as I, I could give better comfort than you do.
Page 413 - You would be, sweet madam, if your miseries were in the same abundance as your good fortunes are: And yet, for aught I see, they are as sick, that surfeit with too much, as they that starve with nothing...

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