Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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T.B. Wait, & Company, 1807 - Law
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Page 267 - ... he looked upon the independence and uprightness of the judges, as essential to the impartial administration of justice ; as one of the best securities of the rights and liberties of his subjects; and as most conducive to the honour of the crown.
Page 413 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Page 214 - ... to be to the heirs of the body of the said Princess; and for default of such issue to the Princess Anne of Denmark, and the heirs of her body ; and for default of such issue to the heirs of the body of the said Prince of Orange.
Page 110 - England as by law established : that, in case the crown and imperial dignity of this realm shall hereafter come to any person, not being a native of this kingdom of England, this nation be not obliged to engage in any war for the defence of any dominions or territories which do not belong to the crown of England, without the consent of Parliament...
Page 444 - Yet the lower rank of people, who were always fond of the old common law, still claim and exert their ancient privilege: and the courts of law will still permit a husband to restrain a wife of her liberty, in case of any gross misbehaviour.
Page 263 - Majesty's realms and dominions the sole supreme government, command and disposition of the militia and of all forces by sea and land and of all forts and places of strength is and by the laws of England ever was the undoubted right of his Majesty and his royal predecessors, kings and queens of England, and that both or either of the Houses of Parliament cannot nor ought to pretend to the same...
Page 210 - That King James II., having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of the kingdom, by breaking the original contract between king and people ; and by the advice of Jesuits and other wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws and having withdrawn himself out of the kingdom, has abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby vacant.
Page 125 - THE absolute rights of man, considered as a free agent, endowed with discernment to know good from evil, and with power of choosing those measures which appear to him to be most desirable, are usually summed up in one general appellation, and denominated the natural liberty of mankind.
Page 234 - Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the gospel and the protestant reformed religion established by law...
Page 105 - Ireland; and that the doctrine, worship, discipline, and government of the said united church shall be, and shall remain, in full force for ever, as the same are now by law established for the church of England ; and that the continuance and preservation of the said united church, as the established church of England and Ireland, shall be deemed and taken to be an essential and fundamental part of the Union...

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