Brokers of Culture: Italian Jesuits in the American West, 1848-1919

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Stanford University Press, 2007 - History - 428 pages
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Brokers of Culture examines the interactions among multiple ethnic groups in the American West and a group of nearly four hundred Italian Jesuits who emigrated to the United States after 1848 in the wake of the Italian unification movement. The first wave of exiles taught in Jesuit colleges on the East Coast, where they played a major role in reforming American seminary education. From their eastern base, the dispersed clerics moved to the frontier, shaping the evolution of culture in eleven western states. The Jesuits’ most powerful source of influence was their western colleges, which adhered to educational traditions brought from Europe while simultaneously meeting the needs of an ethnically mixed and mobile frontier population.

  

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Contents

Introduction The Jesuits
1
Out with the Jesuits Becoming Refugees
14
Instant Despatch The Ideology of Emigration
36
Witnesses to Shortcomings Reforming Jesuit America
61
Attracted Toward Remote Lands Becoming Western Missionaries
91
Methods Adopted by Us The Art of Indian Conversion
120
Habits of Industry and Useful Toil Native American Education
150
The Darkest Part of the USA The Southwest
178
Our Pen Is at Your Service Mediating Cultures
234
A Delicate State of Transition Jesuits Divided
264
Sic Transit Gloria Mundi Foreign No More
296
Conclusion
320
Abbreviations
329
Notes
331
Glossary
395
Index
397

Who Could Have Done Anything Like This in Italy? The Colleges
208

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About the author (2007)

Gerald McKevitt is Ignacio Ellacuría SJ Professor of Jesuit Studies at Santa Clara University. He is author of The University of Santa Clara: A History, 1851-1977 (Stanford University Press, 1979).

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