A THEORY OF JUSTICE (ORIG EDN)

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Harvard University Press, 1971 - Philosophy - 607 pages
70 Reviews
Though the revised edition of A Theory of Justice, published in 1999, is the definitive statement of Rawls's view, so much of the extensive literature on Rawls's theory refers to the first edition. This reissue makes the first edition once again available for scholars and serious students of Rawls's work.
  

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Review: A Theory of Justice

User Review  - Ron - Goodreads

Classic, but better synthesis provided by Robert Nozick Read full review

Review: A Theory of Justice

User Review  - Dave Peticolas - Goodreads

In this work of political philosophy, Rawls works out his theory of justice, a contract theory along the lines of Kant and Rousseau, but without the Kantian metaphysics. I enjoyed this book immensely. Highly Recommended. Read full review

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Contents

JUSTICE AS FAIRNESS
1
2 The Subject of Justice
5
3 The Main Idea of the Theory of Justice
9
4 The Original Position and Justification
15
5 Classical Utilitarianism
20
6 Some Related Contrasts
25
7 Intuitionism
32
8 The Priority Problem
38
46 Further Cases of Priority
296
47 The Precepts of Justice
301
48 Legitimate Expectations and Moral Desert
308
49 Comparison with Mixed Conceptions
313
50 The Principle of Perfection
323
DUTY AND OBLIGATION
331
52 The Arguments for the Principle of Fairness
340
53 The Duty To Comply with an Unjust Law
348

9 Some Remarks about Moral Theory
44
THE PRINCIPLES OF JUSTICE
52
11 Two Principles of Justice
58
12 Interpretations of the Second Principle
63
13 Democratic Equality and the Difference Principle
73
14 Fair Equality of Opportunity and Pure Procedural Justice
81
15 Primary Social Goods as the Basis of Expectations
88
16 Relevant Social Positions
93
17 The Tendency to Equality
98
The Principle of Fairness
106
The Natural Duties
112
THE ORIGINAL POSITION
116
21 The Presentation of Alternatives
120
22 The Circumstances of Justice
124
23 The Formal Constraints of the Concept of Right
128
24 The Veil of Ignorance
134
25 The Rationality of the Parties
140
26 The Reasoning Leading to the Two Principles of Justice
148
27 The Reasoning Leading to the Principle of Average Utility
159
28 Some Difficulties with the Average Principle
165
29 Some Main Grounds for the Two Principles of Justice
173
30 Classical Utilitarianism Impartiality and Benevolence
181
Institutions
191
EQUAL LIBERTY
193
32 The Concept of Liberty
199
33 Equal Liberty of Conscience
203
34 Toleration and the Common Interest
209
35 Toleration of the Intolerant
214
36 Political Justice and the Constitution
219
37 Limitations on the Principle of Participation
226
38 The Rule of Law
233
39 The Priority of Liberty Defined
241
40 The Kantian Interpretation of Justice as Fairness
249
DISTRIBUTIVE SHARES
256
42 Some Remarks about Economic Systems
263
43 Background Institutions for Distributive Justicw
272
44 The Problem of Justice between Generations
282
45 Time Preference
291
54 The Status of Majority Rule
354
55 The Definition of Civil Disobedience
361
56 The Definition of Conscientious Refusal
366
57 The Justification of Civil Disobedience
369
58 The Justification of Conscientious Refusal
375
59 The Role of Civil Disobedience
380
Ends
391
GOODNESS AS RATIONALITY
393
61 The Definition of Good for Simpler Cases
397
62 A Note on Meaning
402
63 The Definition of Good for Plans of Life
405
64 Deliberative Rationality
414
65 the Aristotelian Principle
422
66 The Definition of Good Applied to Person
431
67 SelfRespect Excellences and Shame
438
68 Several Contrasts between the Right and the Good
444
THE SENSE OF JUSTICE
451
70 The Morality of Authority
460
71 The Morality of Association
465
72 The Morality of Principles
470
73 Features of the Moral Sentiments
477
74 The Connection between Moral and Natural Attitudes
483
75 The Principles of Moral Psychology
488
76 The Problem of Relative Stability
494
77 The Basis of Equality
502
THE GOOD OF JUSTICE
511
79 The Idea of Social Union
518
80 The Problem of Envy
528
81 Envy and Equality
532
82 The Grounds for the Priority of Liberty
539
83 Happiness and Dominant Ends
546
84 Hedonism as a Method of Choice
552
85 The Unity of the Self
558
86 The Good of the Sense of Justice
565
87 Concluding Remarks on Justification
575
Index
587
Copyright

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About the author (1971)

John Rawls was James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard University. He was recipient of the 1999 National Humanities Medal.

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