Ingoldsby Legends (Google eBook)

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R. Bentley, 1852 - English literature - 320 pages
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Page 212 - ... he cursed him in bed; From the sole of his foot to the crown of his head; He cursed him in sleeping, that every night He should dream of the Devil, and wake in a fright. He cursed him in eating, he cursed him in drinking, He cursed him in coughing, in sneezing, in winking; He cursed him in sitting, in standing, in lying; He cursed him in walking, in riding, in flying; He cursed him living, he cursed him dying! Never was heard such a terrible curse! But what gave rise To no little surprise,...
Page 124 - Not poppy, nor mandragora, Nor all the drowsy syrups of the world, Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep Which thou ow'dst yesterday.
Page 212 - His pinions droop'd he could hardly stand, His head was as bald as the palm of your hand ; His eye so dim, So wasted each limb, That, heedless of grammar, they all cried " THAT'S HIM ! That's the scamp that has done this scandalous thing! That's the thief that has got my Lord Cardinal's Ring...
Page 99 - THERE stands a City, neither large nor small, Its air and situation sweet and pretty ; It matters very little if at all Whether its denizens are dull or witty, Whether the ladies there are short or tall, Brunettes or blondes, only, there stands a city !Perhaps 'tis also requisite to minute That there's a Castle and a Cobbler in it. A fair Cathedral, too, the story goes, And kings and heroes lie...
Page 284 - Dark rifle green, with a lining of drab ; Through street, and through square, His high-trotting mare, Like one of Ducrow's, goes pawing the air, Adown Piccadilly and Waterloo Place Went the high-trotting mare at a very quick pace ; She produced some alarm, But did no great harm, Save frightening a nurse with a child on her arm, Spattering with clay Two urchins at play...
Page 46 - ... large swing-glass that flanked the dressing-table, he paused, as if contemplating his figure in it. He now returned towards the bed ; put on his slippers, and, with cautious and stealthy steps, proceeded towards the little arched doorway that opened on the private staircase. As he drew the bolt, Tom Ingoldsby emerged from his hiding-place : but the sleep-walker heard him not ; he proceeded softly down stairs, followed at a due distance by his friend ; opened the door which led out upon the gardens...
Page 277 - With Dukes and Marquises on bended knee ; And they did splash her with raal Macasshur, And the Queen said, ' Ah ! then thank ye all for me ! ' Then the trumpets braying, and the organ playing, And sweet trombones, with their silver tones ; But Lord Rolle was rolling 'twas mighty consoling To think his Lordship did not break his bones...
Page 212 - The monks and the friars they searched till dawn; - When the Sacristan saw, On crumpled claw, Come limping a poor little lame Jackdaw; No longer gay, As on yesterday; His feathers all seemed to be turned the wrong way; His pinions drooped, he could hardly stand, His head was...
Page 287 - twas the last concluding stroke ! And then my Lord Tomnoddy awoke ! And Tregooze and Sir Carnaby Jenks arose, And Captain M'Fuze, with the black on his nose : And they stared at each other, as much as to say
Page 210 - Rheims and Namur, Which a nice little boy stood ready to catch In a fine golden hand-basin made to match. Two nice little boys, rather more grown, Carried lavender-water, and eau de Cologne; And a nice little boy had a nice cake of soap, Worthy of washing the hands of the Pope. One little boy more A napkin bore, Of the best white diaper, fringed with pink, And a Cardinal's Hat mark'd in 'permanent ink'.

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