A history of the fishes of the British Islands, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Page 116 - The Sucking-fish beneath, with secret chains, Clung to the keel, the swiftest ship detains. The seamen run confused, no labour spared, Let fly the sheets, and hoist the topmost yard.
Page 207 - It makes but little difference what the prey is, either in respect of size or quality. A fisherman had hooked a Cod-fish, and while drawing it up he felt a heavier weight attach itself to his line : this proved to be an Angler of large size, which he compelled to quit its hold by a heavy blow on its head, leaving its prey still attached to the hook.
Page 110 - After some farther play, the fish swam off in the wake of the vessel, his dorsal fin being long distinctly visible above the water. When he had gone however a considerable distance, he suddenly turned round, darted after the vessel, and, before the Pilotfish could overtake him and interpose, snapped at the bait and was taken. In hoisting him up, one of the Pilots was observed to cling to his side until he was half above water, when it fell off. All the...
Page 208 - ... stomach twenty-one flounders and a dory, all of them of sufficient size and sufficiently uninjured to make a good appearance in the market where they were sold. And how indiscriminately fishes feed on each other appears from the fact, that in the stomach of an angler which measured two feet and a half, was found a codfish that measured two feet ; and in the latter were the skeletons of two whitings ; within which, again, were other small fishes. As this fish has on some occasions displayed a...
Page 62 - Both sides of the fish were wholly white, without a spot upon them ; the dorsal fin was the only part of a different colour, being a blackish green : this fin ran all along the back from the gills to the tail, consisting of a great number of rays, soft, and little more than an inch long. Each of the pectoral fins had six double rays. There were no ventral nor anal fins ; but the belly was a sharp, smooth, and entire edge. The tail ended in a point, consisting of three or four soft spines or bristles...
Page 62 - ... the fish were wholly white, without a spot upon them ; the dorsal fin was the only part of a different colour, being a blackish green : this fin ran all along the back from the gills to the tail, consisting of a great number of rays, soft, and little more than an inch long. Each of the pectoral fins had six double rays. There were no ventral nor anal fins ; but the belly was a sharp, smooth, and entire edge. The tail ended in a point, consisting of three or four soft spines or bristles of different...
Page 205 - Him in a narrow place he overtook, And fierce assailing forc'd him turn again: Sternly he turn'd again, when he him strook With his sharp steel, and ran at him amain With open mouth, that seemed to contain A full good peck within the outmost brim, All set with iron teeth in ranges twain, That terrified his foes, and armed him, Appearing like the mouth of Orcus grisly grim: XXVII.
Page 62 - The length of the head could not be measured exactly, but was about eight or nine inches : the body, from the gills to the point of the tail, was three feet two inches long ; its greatest breadth six inches and a quarter, and its greatest thickness only an inch : the vent was two inches from the gills ; these were much broken, and partly gone, so that the number of the rays could not be ascertained. Both sides of the fish were wholly white, without a spot upon them ; the dorsal fin was the only part...
Page 116 - The seamen run confus'd, no labour spared, Let fly the sheets, and hoist the topmast yard; The master bids them give her all the sails, To court the winds and catch the coming gales; But though the canvas bellies with the blast, And boisterous winds bend down the cracking mast, The bark stands firmly rooted on the sea, And all unmov'd as tower or towering tree.
Page 148 - Lilian says (b. xxxii, c. 6) that the Sword-fish has a sharp-pointed snout, with which it is able to pierce the sides of a ship and send it to the bottom, instances of which have been known near a place in Mauritania known as Cotte, not far from the river Lixus, on the African side of the Mediterranean. He describes the sword as like the beak of the ship known as the trireme, which was rowed with three banks of oars.

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