The Perfect Wrong Note: Learning to Trust Your Musical Self

Front Cover
Hal Leonard Corporation, 2006 - Music - 239 pages
2 Reviews
Drawing on experience, psychological insight, and wisdom ancient and modern, the author shows how to trust yourself and set your own musicality free. Practising, in the author's view is a lively, honest, adventurous, and rewarding enterprise, and it can be met with daily success, which empowers us to grow even more.
  

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User Review  - quaintlittlehead - LibraryThing

If you have taken music lessons for more than a little while, you will recognise part of yourself in this book. Westney describes all the psychological pitfalls that come with classical music study ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - samfsmith - LibraryThing

This book reinforces the idea that it is OK to make mistakes - a good thing, since I make a lot of them. Surprising how many musicians subscribe to the cult that mistakes in practice are bad. The best ... Read full review

Contents

Music Magic and Childhood
15
Vitality
29
Juicy Mistakes
51
Step by Step A Guide to Healthy Practicing
77
Breakthroughs
99
Is It Good to Be a Good Student?
117
Out of Control The Drama of Performing
137
Lessons and UnLessons
153
Adventurous Amateurs
201
Beyond the Music Room
213
A Word to Health Professionals
223
Resources
228
Notes
230
Bibliography
233
Index
236
About the Author
238

The UnMaster Class Rethinking a Tradition
173

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About the author (2006)

William Westney holds two endowed faculty positions as Texas Tech University. He has been honored with many professional awards as educator and artist, including the Yale School of Music Alumni Association's prestigious Certificate of Merit. Westney's acclaimed Un-Master Class performance workshop, which has been featured in The New York Times, is increasingly in demand in the United States and abroad. An active concert pianist, he won the Geneva International Competition and holds master's and doctorate degrees in performance from Yale University. He lives in Lubbock, Texas.

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