The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Illustrated) (Google eBook)

Front Cover
BompaCrazy.com, Dec 22, 2013 - Fiction - 286 pages
4 Reviews

240+ Illustrations

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is commonly accounted as one of the first Great American Novels. It is also one of the first major American novels ever written using local color regionalism, or vernacular, told in the first person by the eponymous Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, best friend of Tom Sawyer and narrator of two other Twain novels (Tom Sawyer Abroad and Tom Sawyer, Detective). It is a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.

The book is noted for its colorful description of people and places along the Mississippi River, and its sober and often scathing look at entrenched attitudes, particularly racism. The drifting journey of Huck and his friend Jim, a runaway slave, down the Mississippi River on their raft may be one of the most enduring images of escape and freedom in all of American literature.

Go BompaCrazy!
Much of modern scholarship of Huckleberry Finn has focused on its treatment of race. Many Twain scholars have argued that the book, by humanizing Jim and exposing the fallacies of the racist assumptions of slavery, is an attack on racism. Others have argued that the book falls short on this score, especially in its depiction of Jim. According to Professor Stephen Railton of the University of Virginia, Twain was unable to fully rise above the stereotypes of black people that white readers of his era expected and enjoyed, and therefore resorted to minstrel show-style comedy to provide humor at Jim's expense, and ended up confirming rather than challenging late-19th century racist stereotypes.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

nm

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

i love it

Contents

Section 1
2
Section 2
46
Section 3
117

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2013)

ˇSamuel Langhorne Clemens (1835?1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. He is most noted for his novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called "the Great American Novel."

Go BompaCrazy!
Twain was born during a visit by Halley's Comet, and he predicted that he would "go out with it" as well. He died the day following the comet's subsequent return. He was lauded as the "greatest American humorist of his age," and William Faulkner called Twain "the father of American literature."

Bibliographic information