Being Made Strange: Rhetoric beyond Representation

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SUNY Press, May 11, 2004 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 229 pages
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By elaborating upon pivotal twentieth-century studies in language, representation, and subjectivity, Being Made Strange reorients the study of rhetoric according to the discursive formation of subjectivity. The author develops a theory of how rhetorical practices establish social, political, and ethical relations between self and other, individual and collectivity, good and evil, and past and present. He produces a novel methodology that analyzes not only what an individual says, but also the social, political, and ethical conditions that enable him or her to do so. This book also offers valuable ethical and political insights for the study of subjectivity in philosophy, cultural studies, and critical theory.
  

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User Review  - Bryan - Goodreads

For anyone interested in rhetorical theory and the subject, take a stab at this dense, but all the more stunning, analysis. Read full review

Contents

The Subject and Object of Representation
21
The Circle of Metaphysics
24
The End of Rhetoric?
36
A Crisis of Representation
37
The Subject and Object of Rhetoric
51
The Ideal of Rhetoric
55
Logocentrism and Rhetorc
61
Rhetoric in the Active Voice
72
Politics Ethics and Alterity
121
Rhetoric and Style Reconfigured
125
Jeffersons Other
133
Memorys Desires
136
Memorys Memory
152
The Rest Is Silence
157
Silence as Representation
160
Silence as an Origin
164

Rhetoric in the Middle Voice
81
Rhetoric Made Stranger
82
The Middle Voice of Persuasion
88
Discourse Form and Ethos
94
Style without Identity
111
Style Redux
115
Silence as a Rhetorical Condition
170
Rhetoric in a Nonmoral Sense
181
Notes
193
Bibliography
203
Index
223
Copyright

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Page 8 - of speech, we are not thence to conclude, that they imply any thing uncommon, or unnatural. This is so far from being the case, that, on very many occasions, they are both the most natural, and the most common method of uttering our sentiments

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About the author (2004)

Bradford Vivian is Assistant Professor of Communication Studies at Vanderbilt University.

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