America on Record: A History of Recorded Sound

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Cambridge University Press, Dec 5, 2005 - History - 457 pages
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In 1877 Thomas Edison dreamed that one day there would be a talking machine in every home, but even his legendary vision could not have foreseen the way that recorded sound would pervade modern life. From the first thin sheet of tinfoil that was manipulated into retaining sound to the home recordings of rappers in the 1980s and the high-tech studios of the 1990s, this book examines the important technical developments of acoustic, electric, and digital sound reproduction while outlining the cultural impact of recorded music and movies. This second edition highlights the digital revolution of sound recording. First Edition Hb (1995) 0-521-47544-9 First Edition Pb (1995) 0-521-47556-2
  

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User Review  - Christopher - Goodreads

Andy Millard uses his teenage students as a dating pool. He's done this for decades. He befriends couples and then isolates/screws the girl. On the first day of class, he hands out a questionaire to ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
The acoustic
15
The inventors
17
A phonograph in every home
37
The international industry of recorded sound
65
The music
80
Recorded sound in the Jazz Age
96
The electrical
113
The record
244
The studio
258
Perfecting studio recording
285
The cassette culture
313
The digital
329
The media conglomerates
331
Into the digital era
346
Consolidation and connectivity in the digital era
367

The machines
115
Competing technologies
136
Empires of sound
158
Swing and the mass audience
176
High fidelity at last
189
Rocknroll and the revolution in music
223
Abbreviations used in the notes
409
Notes
410
Select discography
437
Recordings index
455
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Andre Millard is Director of American Studies and Professor of History at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He is the author of "Edison and the Business of Innovation," and a contributor to National Public Radio's "Lost and Found Sound.

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