The Soul of the Indian (Google eBook)

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Houghton Mifflin Company, 1911 - Indians of North America - 168 pages
9 Reviews
An effort by a Native American to explain the content and attraction of Indian spirituality, concluding that Christianity and civilization are ultimately incompatible concepts.
  

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Review: The Soul of the Indian

User Review  - Justin Wiggins - Goodreads

An amazing and sobering read published in 1911 about Sioux Native American culture, philosophy, spirituality, and the struggle between the Native Americans and Europeans. I loved this book, and ... Read full review

Review: The Soul of the Indian

User Review  - Joe Savage - Goodreads

Amazing work written in early 20th century paints a vivid picture of Native American Spirituality. This well educated son and grandson of Native Americans shares his heritage as best as possible but ... Read full review

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Page ix - Brother, we do not understand these things. We are told that your religion was given to your forefathers, and has been handed down from father to son. We also have a religion, which was given to our forefathers and has been handed down to us, their children.
Page xiv - He is no respecter of persons, but that in every nation he that feareth Him and worketh righteousness is acceptable to Him.
Page vii - Ye pine-groves, with your soft and soul-like sounds ! And they too have a voice, yon piles of snow, And in their perilous fall shall thunder, God ! Ye living flowers that skirt the...
Page 88 - As a child, I understood how to give. I have forgotten that grace since I became civilized. I lived the natural life, whereas I now live the artificial. Any pretty pebble was valuable to me then; every growing tree an object of reverence. Now I worship with the white man before a painted landscape whose value is estimated in dollars!
Page 163 - I sometimes fancy that such nearness to nature as I have described keeps the spirit sensitive to impressions not commonly felt, and in touch with the unseen powers.
Page 17 - In this type of prayer there was no beseeching of favor or help. All matters of personal or selfish concern, as success in hunting or warfare, relief from sickness, or the sparing of a beloved life, were definitely relegated to the plane of the lower or material mind, and all ceremonies, charms, or incantations designed to secure a benefit or to avert a danger, were recognized as emanating from the physical self. The rites of this physical worship, again, were wholly symbolic, and the Indian no more...
Page 10 - To him, as to other single-minded men in every age and race, from Diogenes to the brothers of Saint Francis, from the Montanists to the Shakers, the love of possessions has appeared a snare, and the burdens of a complex society a source of needless peril and temptation.
Page 115 - With the Indian courage is absolute self-control. The truly brave man, we contend, yields neither to fear nor anger, desire nor agony. He is at all times master of himself. His courage rises to the heights of chivalry, patriotism, and real heroism. "'Let neither cold, hunger, nor pain, nor the fear of them, neither the bristling teeth of danger nor the very jaws of death itself, prevent you from doing a good deed...
Page 24 - It is my personal belief, after thirty-five years' experience of it, that there is no such thing as "Christian civilization." I believe that Christianity and modern civilization are opposed and irreconcilable, and that the spirit of Christianity and of our ancient religion is essentially the same.
Page 89 - He believes profoundly in silence the sign of a perfect equilibrium. Silence is the absolute poise or balance of body, mind, and spirit. The man who preserves his selfhood, ever calm and unshaken by the storms of existence not a leaf, as it were, astir on the tree; not a ripple upon the surface of shining pool his, in the mind of the unlettered sage, is the ideal attitude and conduct of life. If you ask him, "What is silence?" he will answer, "It is the Great Mystery! The holy silence...

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