The English and the Normans : Ethnic Hostility, Assimilation, and Identity 1066-c.1220: Ethnic Hostility, Assimilation, and Identity 1066-c.1220 (Google eBook)

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Oxford University Press, Apr 10, 2003 - 474 pages
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Since the Anglo-Norman period itself, the relations beween the English and the Normans have formed a subject of lively debate. For most of that time, however, complacency about the inevitability of assimilation and of the Anglicization of Normans after 1066 has ruled. This book first challenges that complacency, then goes on to provide the fullest explanation yet for why the two peoples merged and the Normans became English. Drawing on anthropological theory, the latest scholarship on Anglo-Norman England, and sources ranging from charters and legal documents to saints' lives and romances, it provides a complex exploration of ethnic relations on the levels of personal interaction, cultural assimilation, and the construction of identity. As a result, the work provides an important case study in pre-modern ethnic relations that combines both old and new approaches, and sheds new light on some of the most important developments in English history.
  

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Contents

Introduction
3
English Identity Before the Norman Conquest
20
Normanitas
32
Ethnic Identity and Cultural Difference
46
A Chronology of Assimilation
56
A Chronology of Identity
70
Ideology Prejudice and Assimilation
83
PERSONAL INTERACTION ASSIMILATION AND IDENTITY
93
The Image of England and a Sense of Place
261
Royal Government England and Englishness
274
The English Church English Saints England and the English
283
Stereotypes and the Image of the English
297
The Image of the Other
307
The Intensification and Politicization of English Identity
323
IDENTITY AND CULTURE
345
History and Identity
347

The Interaction of English and Normans Methodological Considerations
95
The Aristocracy
105
English Women and Norman Men
138
The Peasants and the Middling Sort
161
Townspeople
181
The Religious
200
Epilogue to Part II
236
THE RECONSTRUCTION OF ENGLISH IDENTITY
239
The Defence of English Honour
241
High Culture Religious Culture and Ethnicity
367
Language Literature and Ethnic Identity
377
Conclusion
391
Native English Landholders in the Cartae Baronum
396
Notable Native Patrilineages and Individuals
400
Bibliography
407
Index
445
Copyright

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