The North American arithmetic: part third, for advanced scholars (Google eBook)

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Jenks, Palmer & Co., 1849 - Arithmetic - 288 pages
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Page 55 - RULE. Divide as in whole numbers, and from the right hand of the quotient point off as many places for decimals as the decimal places in the dividend exceed those in the divisor.
Page 7 - ... 11 eleven 12 twelve 13 thirteen 14 fourteen 15 fifteen 16 sixteen 17 seventeen 18 eighteen 19 nineteen 20 twenty 21 twenty-one 22 twenty-two...
Page 183 - Bring down the first figure of the next period to the remainder for a new dividend, to which find a new divisor as before, and in like manner proceed till the whole be finished.
Page 114 - Multiply each debt by its term of credit, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the debts. The quotient will be the average term of credit.
Page 219 - Thirty days after sight of this first of exchange (second and third of the same tenor and date unpaid...
Page 178 - ... and to the remainder bring down the next period for a dividend. 3. Place the double of the root already found, on the left hand of the dividend for a divisor. 4. Seek how often the divisor is contained...
Page 38 - To reduce a mixed number to an improper fraction, RULE : Multiply the whole number by the denominator of the .fraction, to the product add the numerator, and write the result over the denominator.
Page 212 - Multiply continually together all the terms of the natural series of numbers, from 1 up to the given number, and the last product will be the answer.
Page 216 - EXCHANGE. EXCHANGE is the act of paying or receiving the money of one country for its equivalent in the money of another country, by means of bills of exchange. This operation, therefore, comprehends both the reduction of moneys, and the negotiation of bills. It determines the comparative value of the currencies of...
Page 252 - The Gramme, which is the weight of a cubic centimetre of distilled water of the temperature of melting ice, is the unit of all weights.

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