1876: a novel

Front Cover
Random House, 1976 - Fiction - 364 pages
21 Reviews
The third volume of Gore Vidal's magnificent series of historical novels aimed at demythologizing the American past, 1876 chronicles the political scandals and dark intrigues that rocked the United States in its centennial year. Charles Schemerhorn Schuyler, Aaron Burr's unacknowledged son, returns to a flamboyant America after his long, self-imposed European exile. The narrator of Burr has come home to recoup a lost fortune by arranging a suitable marriage for his beautiful daughter, the widowed Princess d'Agrigente, and by ingratiating himself with Samuel Tilden, the favored presidential candidate in the centennial year. With these ambitions and with their own abundant charms, Schuyler and his daughter soon find themselves at the centers of American social and political power at a time when the fading ideals of the young republic were being replaced by the excitement of empire. A consummate work of historical fiction by an acknowledged master of the art.

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Review: 1876 (Narratives of Empire #3)

User Review  - Angie Schuller Wyatt - Goodreads

Not my typical genre, but good for my repertoire. Will probably finish the series in time. No rush. Read full review

Review: 1876 (Narratives of Empire #3)

User Review  - Joshua - Goodreads

The thing with this novel is that the title refers more to the year than to the election. What Vidal wants is to portray The Gilded Age in all of it's decadence and corruption, and I think he succeeds ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
16
Section 3
42
Copyright

32 other sections not shown

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About the author (1976)

Gore Vidal is the author of twenty-two novels, five plays, many screenplays and short stories, more than two hundred essays, and a memoir. Two of his American chronicle novels, Lincoln and 1876, were the subject of cover stories in Time and Newsweek, respectively. In 1993, a collection of his criticism, United States: Essays 1952-1992, won the National Book Award. He divides his time between Ravello, Italy, and Los Angeles.

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