Introduction to Classical Chinese Philosophy (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Hackett Publishing, Mar 11, 2011 - 289 pages
0 Reviews
"This book is an introduction in the very best sense of the word. It provides the beginner with an accurate, sophisticated, yet accessible account, and offers new insights and challenging perspectives to those who have more specialized knowledge. Focusing on the period in Chinese philosophy that is surely most easily approachable and perhaps is most important, it ranges over of rich set of competing options. It also, with admirable self-consciousness, presents a number of daring attempts to relate those options to philosophical figures and movements from the West. I recommend it very highly." --Lee H. Yearley, Stanford University


"This book on philosophers who arose in the Eastern Zhou Dynasty is also an introduction to comparative ways of nonsuperficial thinking both within Chinese tradition and between Chinese tradition and the West. . . . The work is carefully detailed at every philosophically interesting turn, providing, e.g., a detailed discussion of mysticism that does not conflate traditions but sees distinctiveness. Throughout there are translations of technical terms, along with both pinyin and Chinese characters. Chapters conclude with well-crafted review questions. . . . Appendixes on hermeneutics, Chinese language, and the Kongzi are very useful. Summing up: Highly recommended." --F. J. Hoffman, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, in Choice


"Van Norden's book is a very good introduction to the classical Chinese thinkers, especially for those interested in the Chinese-Western comparative approach. It is much stronger on the Confucians (especially Mengzi and Xunzi), Mozi, and the school of names than on the Daoists, and I highly recommend it as an introductory text for further study in Confucianism." --Alexus McLeod, University of Dayton, in Dao
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Historical Context
1
2 Kongzi and Confucianism
17
3 Kongzi and Virtue Ethics
33
4 Mohist Consequentialism
49
5 Yang Zhu and Egoism
69
6 Mengzi and Human Nature
83
7 Language and Paradox in the School of Names
101
8 The Daodejing and Mysticism
121
12 Later Chinese Thought
201
Appendix A Hermeneutics or How to Read a Text
223
Appendix B The Chinese Language and Writing System
235
Appendix C Kongzi as Systematic Philosopher
249
Sources for Facts and Myths
257
Illustration Credits
258
Endnotes
259
Index
265

9 Zhuangzis Therapeutic Skepticism and Relativism
141
10 Xunzis Confucian Naturalism
163
11 Han Feizi
185
Back Cover
272
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Bryan W. Van Norden is Professor in the Philosophy Department, and in the department of Chinese and Japanese, at Vassar College.

Bibliographic information