Handbook of Youth Mentoring

Front Cover
David L. DuBois, Michael J. Karcher
SAGE, Mar 8, 2005 - Psychology - 608 pages
2 Reviews
'The scope and depth of scholarship and application pertinent to youth mentoring is masterfully integrated in this significant and timely resource. This handbook is a vital reference for researchers, practitioners, and policy makers concerned with the promotion of positive youth development' - Richard M. Lerner, Tufts University

'Handbook of Youth Mentoring provides excellent and remarkably comprehensive coverage of the theory, research, and practice. This volume provides researchers and practitioners with the most up-to-date knowledge on effective mentoring. It thoroughly covers different types of mentoring relationships, for different groups of youth, and in different institutional and program contexts. A must-have for anyone wanting to be up-to-date on mentoring' -Reed Larson, University of Illinois

'In my opinion, this book is a must for the field. I'm pleased that these two editors have taken on the challenge of pulling it together. They are quite ideally suited for the task. . . . I give it the very highest rating' -Michael Nakkula, Harvard Graduate School of Education

With the support of a growing array of not-for-profit organizations, corporations, and government initiatives, mentoring programs now touch the lives of millions of youth each year. Countless more youth are impacted by mentoring relationships that develop through informal contacts between adults and young persons in schools, extracurricular activities, neighborhoods, and other settings.

Handbook of Youth Mentoring addresses the need for a scholarly and comprehensive synthesis of current theory, research, and practice in the field of youth mentoring. Editors David L. DuBois and Michael J. Karcher, along with leading experts in the field, offer critical and informative analyses of the full spectrum of topics that are essential to advancing our understanding of the principles for effective mentoring of young people. The Handbook explores not only mentoring that occurs within formal programs such as 'Big Brothers Big Sisters', but also examines natural mentoring relationships that youth establish with adults outside of such programs.

Key Features

Offers the first scholarly rigorous and comprehensive examination of the field of youth mentoring

Includes contributions by leading U.S. and international experts in the field of youth mentoring

Provides an Introduction by the volume editors to frame the various chapters and themes presented in the book

Uses an accessible, non-technical style of presentation, with detailed discussions of implications for practice and public policy

Examines special populations of youth, such as juvenile offenders, pregnant teens, gifted and talented students, abused and neglected youth, and youth with disabilities

The Handbook is sure to affect the lives of current and future generations of youth by helping shape mentoring practices, research, and policies throughout the world. It is an essential resource for scholars, professionals, and practitioners in the fields of psychology, education, human development and family studies, and human services. The Handbook is also an excellent addition to any academic library.

  

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this is the bible of youth mentoring. very thorough. perfect for those who are serious about providing high-quality mentoring for youth through formal mentoring relationships. an excellent resource!

Contents

Youth Mentoring Theory Research and Practice
2
CONCEPTS FRAMEWORKS AND FOUNDATIONS
13
Mentoring in Historical Perspective
14
A Model of Youth Mentoring
30
Research Methodology
44
Toward a Typology of Mentoring
65
MENTORING RELATIONSHIPS
81
The Stages and Development of Mentoring Relationships
82
Integration of Mentoring With Other Programs and Services
314
CONTEXTS OF MENTORING
335
Schools
336
Work and ServiceLearning
348
AfterSchool Programs
364
FaithBased Organizations
376
International The UK and Europe
392
International Australia and New Zealand
408

Assessment of Mentoring Relationships
100
A Counseling and Psychotherapy Perspective on Mentoring Relationships
118
Mentoring Relationships and Social Support
133
Natural Mentoring Relationships
143
DEVELOPMENTAL AND CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES
159
Mentoring Children
160
Mentoring Adolescents
177
Race Ethnicity and Culture in Mentoring Relationships
191
Gender in Mentoring Relationships
205
FORMAL MENTORING PROGRAMS
219
Developing a Mentoring Program
220
Recruiting and Sustaining Volunteer Mentors
235
Evaluating Mentoring Programs
251
CrossAge Peer Mentoring
266
Intergenerational Mentoring
286
EMentoring
300
SPECIAL POPULATIONS
423
Talented and Gifted Youth
424
Academically atRisk Students
440
Juvenile Offenders
454
Pregnant and Parenting Adolescents
467
Abused and Neglected Youth
482
Youth With Disabilities
493
POLICY ISSUES
509
Youth Mentoring and Public Policy
510
CostBenefit and CostEffectiveness Analyses
525
Mentoring for Results Accountability at the Individual Program Community and Policy Levels
546
Author Index
561
Subject Index
579
About the Editors
595
About the Contributors
596
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

David L. DuBois, Ph.D., is a Professor of Community Health Sciences in the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He received his doctorate in clinical-community psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. DuBois has conducted extensive research on youth mentoring with funding from a variety of sources, including the National Institutes of Health, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and the Institute of Education Sciences. His most recent research includes a comprehensive update of his ground-breaking meta-analytic review of youth mentoring program effectiveness first published more than a decade ago. He is also co-author of After-School Centers and Youth Development: Case Studies of Success and Failure (Cambridge University Press, 2012). Dr. DuBois is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and Society for Community Research and Action and a past Distinguished Fellow of the William T. Grant Foundation. He consults widely to mentoring programs nationally and internationally.

Michael J. Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Education and Human Development at the University of Texas at San Antonio. He received a doctorate in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard University and a doctorate in Counseling Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin. He conducts research on school-based and cross-age peer mentoring as well as on adolescent connectedness and pair counseling. He currently conducts the Study of Mentoring in the Learning Environment (SMILE), which is a three-year research project funded by the William T. Grant Foundation to examine the effects of school-based mentoring.

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