Innovating Musical Tradition in Japan: Negotiating Transmission, Identity, and Creativity in the Sawai Koto School

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ProQuest, 2007 - 469 pages
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The main questions guiding this project can be summarized as follows: First, how do the musicians of the Sawai Koto School influence, and how are they influenced by, the longer established iemoto-system schools and their ideology, which still constitute the dominant structure of the koto music scene? Second, how do these musicians continue tradition, and how do they change tradition by modernizing or globalizing it? The iemoto system, its ideology, and classical koten music maintained in this system are regarded as tradition (the dominant structure) in this context. Further, the aim is to explore how these dynamic processes interlink with the constitution of the musicians' identity. I address these questions by looking at three domains of music practice: learning, performing, and creating music, and further in the human relations present in these domains. In investigating the dialectical relation between agency and structure Bourdieu's theory of practice and his notions of objective structures, habitus, doxa, and symbolic capital are applied. Alan Page Fiske's relational models theory is also applied in order to illuminate what kind of relational forms are created in these music practices.
  

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Contents

THE SAWAI KOTO SCHOOL AN INTRODUCTION 235
20
THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK
23
KOTO HISTORY IN TRADITIONAL JAPAN UP TO 1868
58
KOTO HISTORY IN MODERN JAPAN 18681945
87
KOTO HISTORY IN THE AGE OF GLOBALIZATION IN JAPAN
130
SOCIAL ORGANIZATION IN KOTO MUSIC THE IEMOTO SYSTEM
167
LEARNING KOTO
285
PERFORMING KOTO MUSIC
337
CREATING KOTO MUSIC
383
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