A Treatise on the Etymology and Syntax of the English Language (Google eBook)

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Printed for J. Johnson, 1809 - English language - 425 pages
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Page 164 - Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices, to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...
Page 319 - In words, as fashions, the same rule will hold; Alike fantastic, if too new, or old: Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.
Page 369 - LORD, our heavenly ,Father, Almighty > and everlasting God, who hast safely brought us to the beginning of this day ; De(fend us in the same with thy mighty power ; and grant that this day we fall into no ,sin, neither run into ,any kind of danger ; but that all our doings may be ordered by ,thy governance, to do always that > is ,righteous in thy sight ; through Jesus ,Christ > our Lord.
Page 361 - To where Fleet-ditch with disemboguing streams Rolls the large tribute of dead dogs to Thames, The king of dykes ! than whom no sluice of mud With deeper sable blots the silver flood.
Page 398 - We are apt to rely upon future prospects, and become really expensive while we are only rich in possibility: We live up to our expectations, not to our possessions, and make a figure proportionable to what we may be, not what we are. We outrun our present income, as not doubting to disburse * ourselves out of the profits of some future place, project, or reversion that we have in view.
Page 326 - All expressions which, according to the established rules of language, either have no meaning, or involve a contradiction, or, according to the fair construction of the words, convey a meaning different from the intention of the speaker, should be dismissed.
Page 250 - They are not the men in the nation, the most difficult to be replaced.' The definite article is likewise used to distinguish between things, which are individually different, but have one generic name, and things, which are in truth, one and the same, but are characterized by several qualities. If we say, ' The ecclesiastical and secular powers concurred in this measure,' the expression is ambiguous, as far as language can render it such.
Page 340 - But what I have most at Heart is, that some Method should be thought on for ascertaining and fixing our Language for ever, after such Alterations are made in it as shall be thought requisite. For I am of Opinion...
Page 142 - In the first person simply shall foretells ; In will a. threat, or else a promise dwells. Shall, in the second and the third, does threat ; Will simply, then, foretells the future feat.
Page 211 - A Preposition is a part of speech, devoid itself of signification; but so formed as to unite two words that are significant, and that refuse to coalesce or unite of themselves.

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