The Famous Historie of Fryer Bacon (Google eBook)

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Edmund Goldsmid
Priv. print, 1886
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Page 46 - We can so shape transparent substances, and so arrange them with respect to our sight and objects, that rays can be broken and bent as we please, so that objects may be seen far off or near, under whatever angle we please ; and thus from an incredible distance we may read the smallest letters, and number the grains of dust and sand, on account of the greatness of the angle under which we see them ; and we may manage so as hardly to see bodies, when near to us, on account of the smallness of the angle...
Page 9 - Fryer : and presently raised the ghost of lulian the Apostate, who came up with his body burning, and so full of wounds, that it almost did affright the souldier out of his wits. Then Bacon did command this spirit to speake, and to shew what hee was, and wherefore hee was thus tormented ? Then spake hee to it in this manner : I sometimes was...
Page 12 - You neede not mistrust me, (said Miles) for I have no thought to attempt your chastitie : locke me in any place where there is a bed, and I will not trouble you till to morrow that I rise. She thinking her husband would be angry if she should deny any of his friends so small a request, consented that he should lye there, if that he would be locked up : Miles was contented and presently went to bed, and she locked him into the chamber where he lay. Long had not he beene a bed, but he heard the doore...
Page 14 - ... a trick to put herself free from this feare; for shee put her lover under the bed, the capon and bread she put under a tub, the bottle of wine shee put behinde the chest, and then she did open the doore, and with a dissembling kisse welcomed her husband home, asking him the reason why that he returned so quickly. He told her, that hee had forgot the money that he should have carried with him, but on the morrow betimes hee would be gone. Miles saw and heard all this : and having a desire to taste...
Page 20 - Bacon bids him take comfort, for he would prevent the marriage ; so taking this gentleman in his armes, he set himselfe downe in an enchanted chaire, and suddenly they were carried through the ayre to the chappell. Just as they came in, Fryer Bungye was ioyning their hands to marry them : but Fryer Bacon spoyled his speech, for he strucke him dumbe, so that he could not speake a worde. Then raised he a myst in the chappell, so that neither the father could see his daughter, nor the daughter her father,...
Page 40 - ... horrible crack. A more precise description of gunpowder cannot be given with words: and yet a Jesuit, Barthol. Schwartz, some ages afterwards, has had the honour of the discovery. He likewise mentions a sort of inextinguishable fire, prepared by art, which indicates he knew something of phosphorus. And that he had a notion of the rarefaction of the air, and the structure of the air-pump, is past contradiction. A chariot, he observes, might be framed on the principle of mechanics, which, being...
Page 32 - Wretched Bacon, wretched in thy knowledge, in thy understanding wretched ; for thy art hath beene the ruine of these two gentlemen. Had I been busied in those holy things, the which mine order tyes me to, I had not had that time that made this wicked glasse : wicked...
Page 25 - At the inne doore, Vandermast met him, and asked him, if that were swimming time of the year? Bungye told him, if that he had been . so well horsed as he was, when Fryer Bacon sent him into Germany, he might have escaped that washing. At this Vandermast bit his lip, and said no more, but went in. Bungye thought that he would be even with him, which was in this manner. Vandermast loved a girl well, which was in the house, and sought many times to winne her for gold, love, or promises.
Page 8 - ... set a bason of brasse, that if hee did chance to sleepe in his reading, the fall of the ball out of his hand into the bason, might wake him. Being one day in his study in this manner, and asleepe, the Walloon souldier was got in to him, and had drawne his sword to kill him : but as hee was ready for to strike, downe fell the ball out of Fryer Bacon's hand, and waked him. Hee seeing the souldier stand there with a sword drawne, asked him what hee was ? and wherefore hee came there in that manner...
Page 19 - ... in a coach : and if hee could doe so, he would by his art so direct the horses, that they should come to an old chappell, where hee would attend, and there they might secretly be married.

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