Religion in Britain Since 1945: Believing Without Belonging

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Wiley, Dec 5, 1994 - Religion - 226 pages
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This important book describes as accurately as possible the religious situation of Great Britain at the end of the twentieth century, and evaluates this evidence within a sociological framework.

Two key themes emerge within the book. The first concerns the growing mismatch between indices of religious belief in this country, which remain relatively high, and statistics which reflect either religious membership (in its strict sense) or religious practices, both of which demonstrate a marked decline in the post-war period. Hence the phrase `believing without belonging' which becomes, almost, a refrain within the book. The sacred persists but not necessarily in traditional forms.

The second theme concerns the European framework within which the book is set. As Britain moves inexorably - if not always very steadily - to a greater European identity, the considerable variety of religious cultures within the United Kingdom take on a new significance.

Religion in Britain since 1945 will be welcomed by anyone interested in religion in contemporary society.

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About the author (1994)

Grace Davie lectures in Sociology at the University of Exeter and is the co-author (with G. Ahern) of Inner City God.

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