Eruptions (Google eBook)

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1880
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Page 16 - The disease is evidently neither variola nor vaccinia ; the pustules of eethyma are large, isolated, and frequently covered by black, tenacious scabs, which end in ulceration ; it is neither acne nor mentagra, the pustules of which rarely ever give rise to scabs. The only affections, then, that remain are impetigo and porrigo, and we have merely to compare the character of these two species in order to decide. It is unnecessary to enumerate here the signs by which we know that the disease is not...
Page 13 - ... most instances with propriety, introduced. The first, or introductory chapter, affords some very useful hints on the general characters and management of their diseases; the remarks on diagnosis are especially deserving of notice. The chief point is to determine the elementary lesion ; we have then merely to compare the disease with the few which possess the same elementary character. If the elementary lesion is unaltered, we have only to determine the order to which it belongs, and this is usually...
Page 15 - The fluid of a vesicle may, for example, dry off and leave a small incrustation ; a pustule may be converted into a scab, and the latter give way to an ulcer ; hence it is necessary that we should study these secondary lesions, and know to what primary characters they correspond. Incrustations may succeed vesicles, vesicopustules, and papules ; scabs occur in most pustular diseases, and ulceration may be a consequence of rupia, ecthyma, &c.
Page 16 - ... of the disease. Now it is easy enough to tell at once that this is a pustular affection, but not so easy to determine its species. The disease is evidently neither variola nor vaccinia ; the pustules of ecthyma are large, isolated, and frequently covered by black, tenacious scabs, which end in ulceration ; it is neither acne nor mentagra, the pustules of which rarely ever give rise to scabs, and are especially followed by chronic indurations.
Page 15 - In cases like the foregoing, we must first ascertain the nature of the secondary lesion, then determine its corresponding primary element, and finally pursue the course just pointed out. For example, a patient comes to us with a disease of the skin...
Page 16 - ... purulent secretion, which dries up, and forms " fresh scabs, these being the most characteristic " features of the disease. Now it is easy enough " to tell at once that this is a pustular affection, " but not so easy to determine its species. The " disease is evidently neither variola nor vac...
Page 16 - ... sparsa. In the preceding cases we have supposed that there were no remains of the distinct elementary lesion, while, in the great majority of cases, on the contrary, some may always be found perfectly unchanged in the neighborhood of the affected part. In some cases different elementary lesions occur in the same subject ; but even here we always find some predominant form, of which the rest are but complications. However, it may happen that we cannot ascertain at once the true nature of the disease....
Page 70 - And, on the other hand, distempers which Nature has plainly brought together and connected by striking analogies and resemblances, the methodical arrangement of Willan and Bateman puts widely asunder (WATSON).
Page 67 - ... form in which the cutaneous (gouty) disease manifests itself, and that there are records of many cases in which the skin and jointaffection are alternated. Sir Thomas Watson,* speaking of psoriasis and lepra says, " I believe that they sometimes depend upon the presence, or the generation, of an excess of acid in the system ; and that they are often cured by alkaline remedies, I am sure.
Page 61 - ... influence. The theory on which this practice is founded is very simple. If all subjects were equally susceptible of the action of the medicine it would be not only safe but advantageous to begin with at least twenty or thirty drops of Fowler's solution for a dose, this being the average dose borne without injury. But as we do not know what a patient will bear, different individuals varying considerably in their tolerance of arsenic, we begin with a moderate dose, say five minims three times a...

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