Biotic Feedbacks in the Global Climatic System: Will the Warming Feed the Warming?

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G. M. Woodwell, Fred T. Mackenzie
Oxford University Press, 1995 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 416 pages
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The problem of global warming is among the most intensely studied and debated topics in ecology and environmental science. But one possible contributor to global warming - biotic feedback - has until now not been addressed with any serious, sustained attention. Featuring papers prepared for a meeting held at Woods Hole to explore the topic, this book provides for the first time a comprehensive overview of the many issues associated with interactions between biota and global warming. Withcontributions from internationally respected scholars in the field, the book will prove invaluable to students and researchers in ecology, climatology, and environmental science.
  

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Contents

Biotic Feedbacks from the Warming of the Earth
3
Climatically Important Biogenic Gases
22
A Plants and Plant Communities
49
Estimates of
85
Evidence from
108
Disturbance Regimes and Biospheric
119
Permafrost and Vegetation Response to Global Warming in North
134
B Soils
157
Net Carbon Metabolism of Oceanic Margins and Estuaries
246
Implications of Increased Solar UVB for Aquatic Ecosystems
263
A Terrestrial and Oceanic Interactions
281
Vegetation Geography and Global Carbon Storage Changes
303
Aspects of Detection
313
B Modeling the Carbon Sink
331
The Terrestrial Uptake of C02 during
351
Uncertainties in
367

The Biogeochemistry of Northern Peatlands and Its Possible Responses
169
A Review
188
for Storage of Carbon in Terrestrial Ecosystems
219
Oceans and Estuaries
231
BIOTIC FEEDBACKS IN THE GLOBAL CLIMATIC SYSTEM
375
Will the Warming Speed the Warming?
393
Index
413
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

George M. Woodwell is at Woods Hole Research Center. Fred T. Mackenzie is at University of Hawaii.

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