The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text of Mr. Steeven's [!] Last Edition, with a Selection of the Most Important Notes ... (Google eBook)

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G. Fleischer, 1805
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Page 151 - I have had a most rare vision. I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was. Man is but an ass, if he go about to expound this dream.
Page 98 - Making it momentary as a sound, Swift as a shadow, short as any dream ; Brief as the lightning in the collied night, That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth. And ere a man hath power to say, Behold ! The jaws of darkness do devour it up : So quick bright things come to confusion.
Page 111 - That very time I saw, (but thou couldst not,) Flying between the cold moon and the earth, Cupid all arm'd: a certain aim he took At a fair vestal, throned by the west; And loos'd his love-shaft smartly from his bow, As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts: But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaft Quench'd in the chaste beams of the wat'ry moon; And the imperial vot'ress passed on, In maiden meditation, fancy-free.
Page 304 - Thou makest darkness, that it may be night ; wherein all the beasts of the forest do move. 21 The lions, roaring after their prey, do seek their meat from GOD.
Page 154 - The Lunatic, the lover and the poet Are of imagination all compact: One sees more devils than vast hell can hold, That is, the madman: the lover, all as frantic. Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt: The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven; And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes and gives to airy...
Page 144 - True delight In the sight Of thy former lady's eye : And the country proverb known, That every man should take his own, In your waking shall be shown : Jack shall have Jill ; Nought shall go ill ; The man shall have his mare again, and all shall be well.
Page 106 - Over hill, over dale, Thorough bush, thorough brier, Over park, over pale, Thorough flood, thorough fire, I do wander every where, Swifter than the moon's sphere; And I serve the fairy queen, To dew her orbs upon the green. The cowslips tall her pensioners be: In their gold coats spots you see; Those be rubies, fairy favours, In those freckles live their savours: I must go seek some dewdrops here, And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.
Page 154 - How easy is a bush supposed a bear! Hip. But all the story of the night told over. And all their minds transfigured so together, More witnesseth than fancy's images, And grows to something of great constancy ; But, howsoever, strange and admirable.

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