Some Memories of Paris (Google eBook)

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W. Blackwood, 1895 - Paris (France) - 308 pages
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Page 312 - Stirling's progress from the humble chairmanship of a primary to the dictator's throne. ... In the use of dramatic possibilities. Mr. Ford is discreet and natural, and without giving Stirling a heroic pose, manages to win for him very hearty sympathy and belief. Stirling's private and domestic story is well knit with that of his public adventures. ... A very good novel.
Page 313 - A glorious story, which cannot be too warmly recommended to all who love a tale that stirs the blood. Perhaps not the least among its many good qualities is the fact that its chivalry is of the nineteenth, not of the sixteenth, century ; that it is a tale of brave men and true, and of a fair woman of to-day. The Englishman who saves the king . . . is as interesting a knight as was Bayard. . . . The story holds the readers attention from first to last."— Critic.
Page 312 - To discern the soul of good in so evil a thing as municipal politics calls for sympathies that are not often united with a sane ethical outlook; but Peter Stirling is possessed of the one without losing his sense of the other, and it is this combination of qualities that make him so impressive and admirable a figure. . . . Both a readable and an ethically helpful book.
Page 312 - Municipal politics calls for sympathies that are not often united with a sane ethical outlook; but Peter Stirling is possessed of the one without losing his sense of the other, and it is this combination of qualities that make him so impressive and admirable a figure. . . . Both a readable and an ethically helpful book/™ The New York Tribune: "A portrait which is both alive and easily recognizable." New York Times : " Mr. Ford's able political novel.
Page 313 - The whole game of playing at revolution is pictured with such nearness and intimacy of view that the wildest things happen as though they were every-day occurrences.
Page 316 - They are full of a gentle philosophizing, very tolerant, quaintly humorous ; they testify to assimilated and mellowed observation, to a quick apprehension of the droll and the picturesque.
Page 316 - ON THE STAGE— AND OFF. The brief career of a would-be actor.
Page 234 - A quoi étant nécessaire de pourvoir, et désirant rétablir le dit art dans sa perfection et l'augmenter autant que faire se pourra ; nous avons jugé à propos d'établir dans notre bonne ville de Paris, une Académie royale de danse composée de treize des plus expérimentés dudit art, etc., etc.
Page 312 - Full of life. The interest never flags. . . It is long since we have read a better novel or one more thoroughly and naturally American.
Page 311 - Too much praise can hardly be given to the management of the tragic close of the book . . . very carefully as well as finely related . . . the tale ends precisely where it should, and this is not one of the least of the several excellences of this delightful story.

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